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Impacts of a Standing Desk Intervention within an English Primary School Classroom: A Pilot Controlled Trial

Sherry, Aron P., Pearson, Natalie, Ridgers, Nicola D., Johnson, William, Barber, Sally E., Bingham, Daniel D., Nagy, Liana C. and Clemes, Stacy A. 2020, Impacts of a Standing Desk Intervention within an English Primary School Classroom: A Pilot Controlled Trial, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 19, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17197048.

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Title Impacts of a Standing Desk Intervention within an English Primary School Classroom: A Pilot Controlled Trial
Author(s) Sherry, Aron P.
Pearson, Natalie
Ridgers, Nicola D.ORCID iD for Ridgers, Nicola D. orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-3515
Johnson, William
Barber, Sally E.
Bingham, Daniel D.
Nagy, Liana C.
Clemes, Stacy A.
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 17
Issue number 19
Article ID 7048
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-09
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) children
classroom interventions
physical activity
primary school
sitting time
sit–stand desk
standing desks
Summary Traditional classroom furniture dictates that children predominantly sit during class time. This study evaluated the impact of providing standing desks within a deprived UK primary school setting over 8 months using mixed-method approaches. All children within a Year 5 class (9–10-year-olds, n = 30) received an adjustable sit–stand desk, while another Year 5 class (n = 30) in a nearby school retained traditional furniture as a control classroom. At baseline, 4 months, and 8 months, activPAL monitors (PAL Technologies, Glasgow, UK) were worn for 7 days to provide time spent sitting and standing. Behavior-related mental health, musculoskeletal discomfort surveys, and a cognitive function test battery were also completed at all three timepoints. Intervention experiences from pupils and the teacher were captured using focus groups, interviews, and classroom observations. At both 4 months and 8 months, multi-level models revealed a reduction in class time sitting in the intervention group compared to the control group ((β (95%CI) 4 months −25.3% (−32.3, −18.4); 8 months −19.9% (−27.05, −12.9)). Qualitative data revealed challenges to teaching practicalities and a gradual decline in behavior-related mental health was observed (intervention vs. control: 4 months +5.31 (+2.55, +8.08); 8 months +7.92 (+5.18, +10.66)). Larger trials within similar high-priority settings are required to determine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of providing standing desks to every child in the classroom.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17197048
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143404

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.