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Expressions of masculinity and associations with suicidal ideation among young males

King, Tania L., Shields, Marissa, Sojo, Victor, Daraganova, Galina, Currier, Dianne, O'Neil, Adrienne, King, Kylie and Milner, Allison 2020, Expressions of masculinity and associations with suicidal ideation among young males, BMC Psychiatry, vol. 20, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12888-020-2475-y.

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Title Expressions of masculinity and associations with suicidal ideation among young males
Author(s) King, Tania L.
Shields, Marissa
Sojo, Victor
Daraganova, Galina
Currier, Dianne
O'Neil, Adrienne
King, Kylie
Milner, AllisonORCID iD for Milner, Allison orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Journal name BMC Psychiatry
Volume number 20
Article ID 228
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1471-244X
1471-244X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Masculinity
Suicidal ideation
Young males
MENTAL-HEALTH
SELF-HARM
GENDER
NORMS
BOYS
CONFORMITY
ADOLESCENT
VIOLENCE
PEOPLE
VALIDITY
Summary BackgroundAdolescent boys and young men are at particular risk of suicide. Suicidal ideation is an important risk factor for suicide, but is poorly understood among adolescent males. Some masculine behaviors have been associated with deleterious effects on health, yet there has been little quantitative examination of associations between masculinity and suicide or suicidal ideation, particularly among boys/young men. This study aimed to examine associations between conformity to masculine norms and suicidal ideation in a sample of adolescents.MethodsA prospective cohort design, this study drew on a sample of 829 Australian boys/young men from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health. Boys were 15–18 years at baseline, and 17–20 years at follow-up. Masculine norms (Wave 1), were measured using the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory (CMNI-22). Suicidal ideation (Wave 2) was a single-item from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Logistic regression analysis was conducted, adjusting for available confounders including parental education, Indigenous Australian identity and area disadvantage.ResultsIn adjusted models, greater conformity to violent norms (OR = 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.03–1.47) and self-reliance norms (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.15–1.70) was associated with higher odds of reporting suicidal ideation. Greater conformity to norms regarding heterosexuality was associated with reduced odds of reporting suicidal ideation (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.68–0.91).ConclusionsThese results suggest that conforming to some masculine norms may be deleterious to the mental health of young males, placing them at greater risk of suicidal ideation. The results highlight the importance of presenting young males with alternative and multiple ways of being a male. Facilitating a relaxation of norms regarding self-reliance, and encouraging help-seeking, is vital. Furthermore, dismantling norms that rigidly enforce masculine norms, particularly in relation to heteronormativity, is likely to benefit the broad population of males, not only those who do not conform to heterosexual and other masculine norms.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-020-2475-y
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143634

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.