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The Rohingya Little Local: exploring innovative models of refugee engagement in Sydney, Australia

Bestman, Amy, Lloyd, Jane, Hawkshaw, Barbara, Kabir, Jawat and Harris, Elizabeth 2020, The Rohingya Little Local: exploring innovative models of refugee engagement in Sydney, Australia, Australian journal of primary health, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 367-373, doi: 10.1071/PY20045.

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Title The Rohingya Little Local: exploring innovative models of refugee engagement in Sydney, Australia
Author(s) Bestman, AmyORCID iD for Bestman, Amy orcid.org/0000-0003-1269-2123
Lloyd, Jane
Hawkshaw, Barbara
Kabir, Jawat
Harris, Elizabeth
Journal name Australian journal of primary health
Volume number 26
Issue number 5
Start page 367
End page 373
Total pages 7
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1448-7527
1836-7399
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
Primary Health Care
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
General & Internal Medicine
co-design
community engagement
health promotion
refugee health
Summary The Rohingya community living in the City of Canterbury-Bankstown in Sydney have been identified as a priority population with complex health needs. As part of ongoing work, AU$10000 was provided to the community to address important, self-determined, health priorities through the Can Get Health in Canterbury program. Program staff worked with community members to support the planning and implementation of two community-led events: a soccer (football) tournament and a picnic day. This paper explores the potential for this funding model and the effect of the project on both the community and health services. Data were qualitatively analysed using a range of data sources within the project. These included, attendance sheets, meeting minutes, qualitative field notes, staff reflections and transcripts of focus group and individual discussions. This analysis identified that the project: (1) enabled community empowerment and collective control over funding decisions relating to their health; (2) supported social connection among the Australian Rohingya community; (3) built capacity in the community welfare organisation –Burmese Rohingya Community Australia; and (4) enabled reflective practice and learnings. This paper presents an innovative model for engaging with refugee communities. Although this project was a pilot in the Canterbury community, it provides knowledge and learnings on the engagement of refugee communities with the health system in Australia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/PY20045
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
16 Studies in Human Society
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143642

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.