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First Nations peoples’ participation in the development of population-wide food and nutrition policy in Australia: a political economy and cultural safety analysis

Browne, Jennifer, Gilmore, Michelle, Lock, Mark and Backholer, Kathryn 2020, First Nations peoples’ participation in the development of population-wide food and nutrition policy in Australia: a political economy and cultural safety analysis, International journal of health policy and management, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.34172/ijhpm.2020.175.

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Title First Nations peoples’ participation in the development of population-wide food and nutrition policy in Australia: a political economy and cultural safety analysis
Author(s) Browne, JenniferORCID iD for Browne, Jennifer orcid.org/0000-0002-6497-2541
Gilmore, Michelle
Lock, MarkORCID iD for Lock, Mark orcid.org/0000-0002-9810-6086
Backholer, KathrynORCID iD for Backholer, Kathryn orcid.org/0000-0002-3323-575X
Journal name International journal of health policy and management
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Kerman University of Medical Sciences
Place of publication Kerman, Iran
Publication date 2020-09-26
ISSN 2322-5939
2322-5939
Keyword(s) Indigenous health
Aboriginal Health
Food Policy
Nutrition Policy
Cultural Safety
Australia
Summary Background: Healthy and sustainable food systems underpin the well-being of Indigenous peoples. Increasingly governments are taking action to improve diets via population-wide policies. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People states that Indigenous peoples have the right to participate in all decisions that affect them. We analysed Australian national food and nutrition policy processes to determine: (i) the participation of Aboriginal organisations, (ii) the issues raised in Aboriginal organisations’ policy submissions, and (iii) the extent to which Aboriginal organisations’ recommendations were addressed in final policy documents. Methods: Political economy and cultural safety lenses informed the study design. We analysed publicly-available documents for Australian population-wide food and nutrition policy consultations occurring 2008-2018. Data sources were policy documents, committee reports, terms of reference and consultation submissions. The submissions made by Aboriginal organisations were thematically analysed and key policy recommendations extracted. We examined the extent to which key recommendations made by Aboriginal organisations were included in the subsequent policy documents. Results: Five food and nutrition policy processes received submissions from Aboriginal organisations. Key themes centred on self-determination, culturally-appropriate approaches to health, and the need to address food insecurity and social determinants of health. These messages were underrepresented in final policy documents, and Aboriginal people were not included in any committees overseeing policy development processes. Conclusion: This analysis suggests that very few Aboriginal organisations have participated in Australian population-wide food and nutrition policy processes and that these policy development processes are culturally unsafe. In order to operationalise First Nations peoples’ right to self-determination, alternative mechanisms are required to redress the power imbalances preventing the full participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in population-wide food and nutrition policy decisions. This means reflecting on deeply embedded institutional structures and the normative assumptions upon which they rest.
Language eng
DOI 10.34172/ijhpm.2020.175
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143718

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.