Long-term assessment of temporal variability in spatial patterns of early life stages of fishes to facilitate estuarine conservation

Costa, Micheli Duarte de Paula and Muelbert, José Henrique 2017, Long-term assessment of temporal variability in spatial patterns of early life stages of fishes to facilitate estuarine conservation, Marine Biology Research, vol. 13, no. 1-Thematic Issue No. 9: Biota of the Patos Lagoon Estuary and Adjacent Marine Coast: Long-term Changes Induced by Natural and Human-related Factors, guest edited by Clarisse Odebrecht, Eduardo Resende Secchi, Paulo Cesar Abreu & José Henrique Muelbert, pp. 74-87, doi: 10.1080/17451000.2016.1213397.

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Title Long-term assessment of temporal variability in spatial patterns of early life stages of fishes to facilitate estuarine conservation
Author(s) Costa, Micheli Duarte de PaulaORCID iD for Costa, Micheli Duarte de Paula orcid.org/0000-0002-4849-2628
Muelbert, José Henrique
Journal name Marine Biology Research
Volume number 13
Issue number 1-Thematic Issue No. 9: Biota of the Patos Lagoon Estuary and Adjacent Marine Coast: Long-term Changes Induced by Natural and Human-related Factors, guest edited by Clarisse Odebrecht, Eduardo Resende Secchi, Paulo Cesar Abreu & José Henrique Muelbert
Start page 74
End page 87
Total pages 15
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01-02
ISSN 1745-1000
1745-1019
Keyword(s) estuarine conservation
long-term research
fish eggs
fish larvae
Patos Lagoon estuary
Summary Estuaries are among the most productive coastal ecosystems, supporting a wide variety of marine fishes and their early stages. High spatial and temporal variability in estuaries implies that management strategies must incorporate dynamic features to be efficient. In our study, we analysed 13 years of data on ichthyoplankton from the Patos Lagoon estuary (Brazil) to assess whether temporal variability can show distinct spatial patterns of fish eggs and larval distribution and to discuss how these results can be helpful to conservation planning. Spatial patterns of fish egg and larval assemblages were evaluated using cluster analysis. Indicator taxa for each group were also calculated as a product of the relative frequency and relative average abundance in each group. In addition, we used generalized linear models to analyse fish egg and larval abundance in relation to environmental variables. Results showed that fish eggs and larvae exhibit high variability among months, years and sampling stations in the time series. Temporal occurrence and spatial distribution were mainly associated with salinity. We found distinct spatial patterns for fish eggs and larvae in the Patos Lagoon estuary. Groups identified were different among years and indicated by a distinct genus. Our results can be considered as a first exploratory step to help managers to decide which species and temporal scale should be studied in detail and incorporated in management plans. Spatial conservation planning incorporating fluctuations in abundance and assemblage structure over time may help to ensure conservation for biodiversity persistence in highly dynamic ecosystems such as the Patos Lagoon estuary.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/17451000.2016.1213397
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0602 Ecology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Informa UK
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30144022

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