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Obesity and brain function: The brain–body crosstalk

Sui, Sophia X. and Pasco, Julie A. 2020, Obesity and brain function: The brain–body crosstalk, Medicina, vol. 56, no. 10, doi: 10.3390/medicina56100499.

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Title Obesity and brain function: The brain–body crosstalk
Author(s) Sui, Sophia X.ORCID iD for Sui, Sophia X. orcid.org/0000-0001-6388-1261
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Journal name Medicina
Volume number 56
Issue number 10
Article ID 499
Total pages 10
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-10
ISSN 1010-660X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
obesity
cognitive function
brain function
BDNF
leptin
inflammation
LATE-LIFE OBESITY
MASS INDEX
FOLLOW-UP
WEIGHT-LOSS
DEMENTIA
RISK
OVERWEIGHT
MORTALITY
MIDLIFE
Summary Dementia comprises a wide range of progressive and acquired neurocognitive disorders. Obesity, defined as excessive body fat tissue, is a common health issue world-wide and a risk factor for dementia. The adverse effects of obesity on the brain and the central nervous system have been the subject of considerable research. The aim of this review is to explore the available evidence in the field of body–brain crosstalk focusing on obesity and brain function, to identify the major research measurements and methodologies used in the field, to discuss the potential risk factors and biological mechanisms, and to identify the research gap as a precursor to systematic reviews and empirical studies in more focused topics related to the obesity–brain relationship. To conclude, obesity appears to be associated with reduced brain function. However, obesity is a complex health condition, while the human brain is the most complicated organ, so research in this area is difficult. Inconsistency in definitions and measurement techniques detract from the literature on brain–body relationships. Advanced techniques developed in recent years are capable of improving investigations of this relationship.
Notes This article belongs to the Special Issue: Exercise Physiology, Muscle Function and Rehabilitation
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/medicina56100499
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30144025

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.