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Environmental influences on foraging effort, success and efficiency in female Australian fur seals

Speakman, Cassie N., Hoskins, Andrew J., Hindell, Mark A., Costa, Daniel P., Hartog, Jason R., Hobday, Alistair J. and Arnould, John P.Y. 2020, Environmental influences on foraging effort, success and efficiency in female Australian fur seals, Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-73579-y.

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Title Environmental influences on foraging effort, success and efficiency in female Australian fur seals
Author(s) Speakman, Cassie N.
Hoskins, Andrew J.
Hindell, Mark A.
Costa, Daniel P.
Hartog, Jason R.
Hobday, Alistair J.
Arnould, John P.Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, John P.Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Article ID 17710
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Summary Understanding the factors which influence foraging behaviour and success in marine mammals is crucial to predicting how their populations may respond to environmental change. The Australian fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus AUFS) is a predominantly benthic forager on the shallow continental shelf of Bass Strait, and represents the greatest biomass of marine predators in south-eastern Australia. The south-east Australian region is experiencing rapid oceanic warming, predicted to lead to substantial alterations in prey diversity, distribution and abundance. In the present study, foraging effort and indices of foraging success and efficiency were investigated in 138 adult female AUFS (970 foraging trips) during the winters of 1998–2019. Large scale climate conditions had a strong influence on foraging effort, foraging success and efficiency. Foraging effort and foraging success were also strongly influenced by winter chlorophyll-a concentrations and sea-surface height anomalies in Bass Strait. The results suggest increasing foraging effort and decreasing foraging success and efficiency under anticipated environmental conditions, which may have population-level impacts.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-73579-y
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30144513

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.