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Factors influencing unmet need for contraception amongst adolescent girls and women in Cambodia

Rizvi, Farwa, Williams, Joanne, Bowe, Steven and Hoban, Elizabeth 2020, Factors influencing unmet need for contraception amongst adolescent girls and women in Cambodia, PeerJ, vol. 8, pp. 1-25, doi: 10.7717/peerj.10065.

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Title Factors influencing unmet need for contraception amongst adolescent girls and women in Cambodia
Author(s) Rizvi, FarwaORCID iD for Rizvi, Farwa orcid.org/0000-0002-0485-8683
Williams, JoanneORCID iD for Williams, Joanne orcid.org/0000-0002-5633-1592
Bowe, StevenORCID iD for Bowe, Steven orcid.org/0000-0003-3813-842X
Hoban, Elizabeth
Journal name PeerJ
Volume number 8
Article ID e10065
Start page 1
End page 25
Total pages 25
Publisher PeerJ Inc.
Place of publication Corte Madera, Calif.
Publication date 2020-10-07
ISSN 2167-8359
2167-8359
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Contraception
Reproductive and sexual health
Family planning
Personal autonomy
Unintended pregnancies
Adolescents
Summary Background Unmet need is the gap between women’s need and their practice of using contraception. Unmet need for contraception in female adolescents and women in Cambodia is a public health concern which may lead to unintended pregnancies or abortions that can contribute to maternal morbidity and mortality. Methods Bronfenbrenner’s Social Ecological Model was used as a theoretical framework to analyze data from the 2014 Cambodian Demographic and Health Survey to ascertain demographic and social factors potentially associated with unmet need for contraception. Bivariate and weighted multiple logistic regression analyses with adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were conducted for 4,823 Cambodian, sexually active females aged 15–29 years. Results The percentage of unmet need for contraception was 11.7%. At the individual level of the Social Ecological Model, there was an increased likelihood of unmet need in adolescent girls 15–19 years and women 20–24 years. Unmet need was decreased in currently employed women. At the microenvironment level, there was an increased likelihood of unmet need with the husband’s desire for more children and when the decision for a woman’s access to healthcare was made by someone else in the household. At the macroenvironment level, unmet need was decreased in women who could access a health facility near their residence to obtain medical care. There were no urban rural differences found in the Cambodian sample population. Conclusion Unmet need for contraception in Cambodian females adolescents and women is associated with younger age, unemployment and low personal autonomy for accessing healthcare but not with education or wealth status. There is a need to implement culturally appropriate reproductive and sexual health literacy programs to increase access to modern contraception and to raise women’s autonomy.
Language eng
DOI 10.7717/peerj.10065
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 06 Biological Sciences
11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30144523

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.