Openly accessible

Chronic voluntary alcohol consumption causes persistent cognitive deficits and cortical cell loss in a rodent model

Charlton, AJ, May, C, Luikinga, SJ, Burrows, EL, Kim, Jee Hyun, Lawrence, AJ and Perry, CJ 2019, Chronic voluntary alcohol consumption causes persistent cognitive deficits and cortical cell loss in a rodent model, Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-55095-w.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
kim-chronicvoluntary-2019.pdf Published version application/pdf 3.53MB 24

Title Chronic voluntary alcohol consumption causes persistent cognitive deficits and cortical cell loss in a rodent model
Author(s) Charlton, AJ
May, C
Luikinga, SJ
Burrows, EL
Kim, Jee HyunORCID iD for Kim, Jee Hyun orcid.org/0000-0002-1299-4300
Lawrence, AJ
Perry, CJ
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 9
Issue number 1
Article ID 18651
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2019-12-09
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX
INTERMITTENT ETHANOL EXPOSURE
REACTION-TIME-TASK
BEHAVIORAL FLEXIBILITY
ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX
PRENATAL EXPOSURE
CEREBRAL-CORTEX
ONSET DEMENTIA
NEURONAL LOSS
BRAIN-DAMAGE
Summary Chronic alcohol use is associated with cognitive decline that impedes behavioral change during rehabilitation. Despite this, addiction therapy does not address cognitive deficits, and there is poor understanding regarding the mechanisms that underlie this decline. We established a rodent model of chronic voluntary alcohol use to measure ensuing cognitive effects and underlying pathology. Rats had intermittent access to alcohol or an isocaloric solution in their home cage under voluntary 2-bottle choice conditions. In Experiments 1 and 2 cognition was assessed using operant touchscreen chambers. We examined performance in a visual discrimination and reversal task (Experiment 1), and a 5-choice serial reaction time task (Experiment 2). For Experiment 3, rats were perfused immediately after cessation of alcohol access period, and volume, cell density and microglial populations were assessed in the prefrontal cortex and striatum. Volume was assessed using the Cavalieri probe, while cell and microglial counts were estimated using unbiased stereology with an optical fractionator. Alcohol-exposed and control rats showed comparable acquisition of pairwise discrimination; however, performance was impaired when contingencies were reversed indicating reduced behavioral flexibility. When tested in a 5-choice serial reaction time task alcohol-exposed rats showed increased compulsivity and increased attentional bias towards a reward associated cue. Consistent with these changes, we observed decreased cell density in the prefrontal cortex. These findings confirm a detrimental effect of chronic alcohol and establish a model of alcohol-induced cognitive decline following long-term voluntary intake that may be used for future intervention studies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-019-55095-w
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30144551

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 28 Abstract Views, 24 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 28 Oct 2020, 07:11:41 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.