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Effectiveness of vocational interventions for gaining paid work for people living with mild to moderate mental health conditions: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Fadyl, JK, Anstiss, D, Reed, Kirk, Khoronzhevych, M and Levack, WMM 2020, Effectiveness of vocational interventions for gaining paid work for people living with mild to moderate mental health conditions: Systematic review and meta-analysis, BMJ Open, vol. 10, no. 10, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-039699.

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Title Effectiveness of vocational interventions for gaining paid work for people living with mild to moderate mental health conditions: Systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Fadyl, JK
Anstiss, D
Reed, KirkORCID iD for Reed, Kirk orcid.org/0000-0003-3342-454X
Khoronzhevych, M
Levack, WMM
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 10
Issue number 10
Article ID e039699
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-10-29
ISSN 2044-6055
2044-6055
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
occupational &
industrial medicine
depression &
mood disorders
anxiety disorders
rehabilitation medicine
social medicine
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT
INDIVIDUAL PLACEMENT
FIDELITY SCALE
DISORDERS
OUTCOMES
MODEL
REHABILITATION
DISABILITY
depression & mood disorders
occupational & industrial medicine
Summary Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of vocational interventions to help people living with mild to moderate mental health conditions gain paid work. Methods: Systematic review of international, peer-reviewed literature. Development of the prepublished protocol and search strategy was done in consultation with stakeholder reference groups consisting of people with lived experience of long-term conditions, advocates and clinicians. We searched academic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, AMED, CINAHL, Proquest Dissertations and Theses database, and Business Source Complete for controlled trials comparing a specific vocational intervention against a control intervention or usual care, published between 1 January 2004 and 1 August 2019. Two authors independently screened search results, extracted data and appraised studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results: Eleven studies met inclusion criteria. Seven studies investigated Individual Placement and Support (IPS) modified for people who were not in intensive mental health treatment services. These studies occurred settings such as community vocational rehabilitation services, a housing programme and community mental health services. The studies provided very low quality evidence that people who receive IPS-style vocational rehabilitation are more likely to gain competitive employment than people who receive usual care (risk ratio 1.70, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.34, seven studies, 1611 participants). The remaining four studies considered cognitive behavioural therapy or specific vocational rehabilitation interventions designed to fit a unique context. There was insufficient evidence from these studies to draw conclusions regarding the effectiveness of non-IPS forms of vocational rehabilitation for people with mild to moderate mental health conditions. Discussion: The meta-analysis showed a clear intervention effect but low precision, and more high-quality studies are needed in this field. There is currently very low quality evidence that IPS-style intervention results in more participants in competitive employment compared with ‘usual care’ control groups in populations with mild to moderate mental health conditions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-039699
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145056

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.