Openly accessible

Monitoring the resilience of a no-take marine reserve to a range extending species using benthic imagery

Perkins, Nicholas R., Hosack, Geoffrey R., Foster, Scott D., Monk, Jacquomo and Barrett, Neville S. 2020, Monitoring the resilience of a no-take marine reserve to a range extending species using benthic imagery, PLoS ONE, vol. 15, no. 8, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0237257.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Monitoring the resilience of a no-take marine reserve to a range extending species using benthic imagery
Author(s) Perkins, Nicholas R.
Hosack, Geoffrey R.
Foster, Scott D.
Monk, JacquomoORCID iD for Monk, Jacquomo orcid.org/0000-0002-1874-0619
Barrett, Neville S.
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 15
Issue number 8
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2020-08
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary Global climate change is driving the redistribution of marine species and thereby potentially restructuring endemic communities. Understanding how localised conservation measures such as protection from additional human pressures can confer resilience to ecosystems is therefore an important area of research. Here, we examine the resilience of a no-take marine reserve (NTR) to the establishment of urchin barrens habitat. The barrens habitat is created through overgrazing of kelp by an invading urchin species that is expanding its range within a hotspot of rapid climate change. In our study region, a multi-year monitoring program provides a unique time-series of benthic imagery collected by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) within an NTR and nearby reference areas. We use a Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal modelling approach to estimate whether the NTR is associated with reduced formation of urchin barrens, and thereby enhances local resilience. Our approach controls for the important environmental covariates of depth and habitat complexity (quantified as rugosity derived from multibeam sonar mapping), as well as spatial and temporal dependence. We find evidence for the NTR conferring resilience with a strong reserve effect that suggests improved resistance to the establishment of barrens. However, we find a concerning and consistent trajectory of increasing barrens cover in both the reference areas and the NTR, with the odds of barrens increasing by approximately 32% per year. Thus, whereas the reserve is demonstrating resilience to the initial establishment of barrens, there is currently no evidence of recovery once barrens are established. We also find that depth and rugosity covariates derived from multibeam mapping provide useful predictors for barrens occurrence. These results have important management implications as they demonstrate: (i) the importance of monitoring programs to inform adaptive management; (ii) that NTRs provide a potential local conservation management tool under climate change impacts, and (iii) that technologies such as AUVs and multibeam mapping can be harnessed to inform regional decision-making. Continuation of the current monitoring program is required to assess whether the NTR can provide long term protection from a phase shift that replaces kelp with urchin barrens.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0237257
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145305

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 23 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 25 Nov 2020, 13:23:30 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.