Ultraprocessed food and chronic noncommunicable diseases: A systematic review and meta‐analysis of 43 observational studies

Lane, Melissa M., Davis, Jessica A., Beattie, Sally, Gómez‐Donoso, Clara, Loughman, Amy, O'Neil, Adrienne, Jacka, Felice, Berk, Michael, Page, Richard, Marx, Wolfgang and Rocks, Tetyana 2020, Ultraprocessed food and chronic noncommunicable diseases: A systematic review and meta‐analysis of 43 observational studies, Obesity Reviews, vol. Early View, no. Online Version of Record before inclusion in an issue, doi: 10.1111/obr.13146.

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Title Ultraprocessed food and chronic noncommunicable diseases: A systematic review and meta‐analysis of 43 observational studies
Author(s) Lane, Melissa M.
Davis, Jessica A.
Beattie, Sally
Gómez‐Donoso, Clara
Loughman, AmyORCID iD for Loughman, Amy orcid.org/0000-0002-0257-1443
O'Neil, Adrienne
Jacka, FeliceORCID iD for Jacka, Felice orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Page, RichardORCID iD for Page, Richard orcid.org/0000-0002-2225-7144
Marx, WolfgangORCID iD for Marx, Wolfgang orcid.org/0000-0002-8556-8230
Rocks, TetyanaORCID iD for Rocks, Tetyana orcid.org/0000-0002-4529-5872
Journal name Obesity Reviews
Volume number Early View
Issue number Online Version of Record before inclusion in an issue
Article ID obr.13146
Total pages 19
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2020-11-09
ISSN 1467-7881
1467-789X
Keyword(s) NOVA
meta-analysis
noncommunicable disease
ultraprocessed food
Summary This systematic review and meta‐analysis investigated the association between consumption of ultraprocessed food and noncommunicable disease risk, morbidity and mortality. Forty‐three observational studies were included (N = 891,723): 21 cross‐sectional, 19 prospective, two case‐control and one conducted both a prospective and cross‐sectional analysis. Meta‐analysis demonstrated consumption of ultraprocessed food was associated with increased risk of overweight (odds ratio: 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23‐1.51; P < 0.001), obesity (odds ratio: 1.51; 95% CI, 1.34‐1.70; P < 0.001), abdominal obesity (odds ratio: 1.49; 95% CI, 1.34‐1.66; P < 0.0001), all‐cause mortality (hazard ratio: 1.28; 95% CI, 1.11‐1.48; P = 0.001), metabolic syndrome (odds ratio: 1.81; 95% CI, 1.12‐2.93; P = 0.015) and depression in adults (hazard ratio: 1.22; 95% CI, 1.16‐1.28, P < 0.001) as well as wheezing (odds ratio: 1.40; 95% CI, 1.27‐1.55; P < 0.001) but not asthma in adolescents (odds ratio: 1.20; 95% CI, 0.99‐1.46; P = 0.065). In addition, consumption of ultraprocessed food was associated with cardiometabolic diseases, frailty, irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia and cancer (breast and overall) in adults while also being associated with metabolic syndrome in adolescents and dyslipidaemia in children. Although links between ultraprocessed food consumption and some intermediate risk factors in adults were also highlighted, further studies are required to more clearly define associations in children and adolescents.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/obr.13146
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, World Obesity Federation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145337

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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