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Experiences of LGBTIQA+ People with Disability in Healthcare and Community Services: Towards Embracing Multiple Identities

O'Shea, Amie, Latham, J. R., McNair, Ruth, Despott, Nathan, Rose, Mellem, Mountford, Ruby and Frawley, Patsie 2020, Experiences of LGBTIQA+ People with Disability in Healthcare and Community Services: Towards Embracing Multiple Identities, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 21, Special Issue Health Inequalities and Social Support among LGBT + Populations), pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17218080.

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Title Experiences of LGBTIQA+ People with Disability in Healthcare and Community Services: Towards Embracing Multiple Identities
Author(s) O'Shea, AmieORCID iD for O'Shea, Amie orcid.org/0000-0002-3718-9551
Latham, J. R.ORCID iD for Latham, J. R. orcid.org/0000-0002-3705-4577
McNair, Ruth
Despott, Nathan
Rose, Mellem
Mountford, Ruby
Frawley, Patsie
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 17
Issue number 21
Season Special Issue Health Inequalities and Social Support among LGBT + Populations)
Article ID 8080
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-11
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) LGBT+ health equity
LGBTIQA+
disability
gender
health inequalities
identity
service provision
sexuality
Summary Healthcare and disability support services are increasing their efforts towards inclusion and recognising the needs of different groups. This research project was conducted by academic and peer researchers (LGBTIQA+ people with disability) in Victoria, Australia using four focus groups with LGBTIQA+ people with disability. We report on two overarching themes relating to participants’ experiences of accessing health services as LGBTIQA+ people with disability: difficulties in managing multiple identities and the impacts of community services and supports. Participants described having to repeatedly ‘come out’ in a range of ways and contexts as complex and layered processes in which it was difficult to present their full range of needs and experiences to services. We also found that the role of community in promoting a sense of belonging and resilience increased capacity to manage health service use and advocacy. Services and communities aiming to be inclusive to all have the opportunity to recognise and respond to the issues faced by LGBTIQA+ people with disability as a way to pay attention to how overt and subtle practices of discrimination continue to operate despite repeated attempts at or claims of being ‘inclusive.’ Our research suggests actual inclusive, accessible services can be achieved in part through policy and practice that actively responds to the specific needs of LGBTIQA+ people with disability, in addition to LGBTIQA+ education for disability services and disability and accessibility education for LGBTIQA+ focused services. As we do in this article, we argue that this work must be done by prioritising authentic participation of LGBTIQA+ people with disability in the services and research that is about them.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17218080
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145338

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.