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Mobile primary health care clinics for Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States: a systematic scoping review

Beks, Hannah, Ewing, Geraldine, Charles, James A., Mitchell, Fiona, Paradies, Yin, Clark, Robyn A. and Versace, Vincent L. 2020, Mobile primary health care clinics for Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States: a systematic scoping review, International Journal for Equity in Health, vol. 19, pp. 1-21, doi: 10.1186/s12939-020-01306-0.

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Title Mobile primary health care clinics for Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States: a systematic scoping review
Author(s) Beks, HannahORCID iD for Beks, Hannah orcid.org/0000-0002-2851-6450
Ewing, Geraldine
Charles, James A.ORCID iD for Charles, James A. orcid.org/0000-0002-9831-4205
Mitchell, Fiona
Paradies, YinORCID iD for Paradies, Yin orcid.org/0000-0001-9927-7074
Clark, Robyn A.
Versace, Vincent L.ORCID iD for Versace, Vincent L. orcid.org/0000-0002-8514-1763
Journal name International Journal for Equity in Health
Volume number 19
Article ID 201
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1475-9276
1475-9276
Keyword(s) Global health
Health services
Indigenous health
Mobile health clinics
Primary health care
Summary BackgroundMobile clinics have been used to deliver primary health care to populations that otherwise experience difficulty in accessing services. Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States experience greater health inequities than non-Indigenous populations. There is increasing support for Indigenous-governed and culturally accessible primary health care services which meet the needs of Indigenous populations. There is some support for primary health care mobile clinics implemented specifically for Indigenous populations to improve health service accessibility. The purpose of this review is to scope the literature for evidence of mobile primary health care clinics implemented specifically for Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States.MethodsThis review was undertaken using the Joanna Brigg Institute (JBI) scoping review methodology. Review objectives, inclusion criteria and methods were specified in advance and documented in a published protocol. The search included five academic databases and an extensive search of the grey literature.ResultsThe search resulted in 1350 unique citations, with 91 of these citations retrieved from the grey literature and targeted organisational websites. Title, abstract and full-text screening was conducted independently by two reviewers, with 123 citations undergoing full text review. Of these, 39 citations discussing 25 mobile clinics, met the inclusion criteria. An additional 14 citations were snowballed from a review of the reference lists of included citations. Of these 25 mobile clinics, the majority were implemented in Australia (n = 14), followed by United States (n = 6) and Canada (n = 5). No primary health mobile clinics specifically for Indigenous people in New Zealand were retrieved. There was a pattern of declining locations serviced by mobile clinics with an increasing population. Furthermore, only 13 mobile clinics had some form of evaluation.ConclusionsThis review identifies geographical gaps in the implementation of primary health care mobile clinics for Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. There is a paucity of evaluations supporting the use of mobile clinics for Indigenous populations and a need for organisations implementing mobile clinics specifically for Indigenous populations to share their experiences. Engaging with the perspectives of Indigenous people accessing mobile clinic services is imperative to future evaluations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12939-020-01306-0
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1608 Sociology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145342

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.