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Mobile application-based interventions for chronic pain patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness

Pfeifer, Ann-Christin, Uddin, Riaz, Schroeder-Pfeifer, Paul, Holl, Felix, Swoboda, Walter and Schiltenwolf, Marcus 2020, Mobile application-based interventions for chronic pain patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness, Journal of clinical medicine, vol. 9, no. 11, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3390/jcm9113557.

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Title Mobile application-based interventions for chronic pain patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness
Author(s) Pfeifer, Ann-Christin
Uddin, RiazORCID iD for Uddin, Riaz orcid.org/0000-0001-8133-9732
Schroeder-Pfeifer, Paul
Holl, Felix
Swoboda, Walter
Schiltenwolf, Marcus
Journal name Journal of clinical medicine
Volume number 9
Issue number 11
Article ID 3557
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-11
ISSN 2077-0383
2077-0383
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
chronic pain
mobile application
rehabilitation
review
meta-analysis
Summary Chronic pain is one of the major causes of disability in the general population. Even though there are effective treatment options available for reducing symptoms, these treatments often do not have consistent lasting effects. As the usage of mobile devices has increased enormously during the last few years, mobile application-based treatment options are widespread. Such app-based programs are not yet empirically proven but might enable patients to become more independent in their pain management in order to prevent relapse. The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the literature on mobile application-based interventions for chronic pain patients. Therefore, three electronic bibliographic databases, PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science, were searched for studies that investigated the effectiveness of mobile application-based intervention for chronic pain on pain intensity. The final sample comprised twenty-two studies, with a total of 4679 individuals. Twelve of these twenty-two studies used a randomized control trial (RCT) design, while ten studies only used an observational design. For all twenty-two studies, a small but significant effect (d = −0.40) was found when compared to baseline measures or control groups. The results suggest that apps-based treatment can be helpful in reducing pain, especially in the long-term.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jcm9113557
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145351

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.