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Sex-specific prevalence, inequality and associated predictors of hypertension, diabetes, and comorbidity among Bangladeshi adults: results from a nationwide cross-sectional demographic and health survey

Ali, Nausad, Akram, Raisul, Sheikh, Nurnabi, Sarker, Abdur Razzaque and Sultana, Marufa 2019, Sex-specific prevalence, inequality and associated predictors of hypertension, diabetes, and comorbidity among Bangladeshi adults: results from a nationwide cross-sectional demographic and health survey, BMJ Open, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029364.

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Title Sex-specific prevalence, inequality and associated predictors of hypertension, diabetes, and comorbidity among Bangladeshi adults: results from a nationwide cross-sectional demographic and health survey
Author(s) Ali, Nausad
Akram, Raisul
Sheikh, Nurnabi
Sarker, Abdur Razzaque
Sultana, Marufa
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 9
Issue number 9
Article ID e029364
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-09
ISSN 2044-6055
2044-6055
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
Bangladesh
NCDs
Comorbidity
Diabetes
Hypertension
MIDDLE-INCOME COUNTRIES
RISK-FACTORS
INSULIN-RESISTANCE
DISEASE
AWARENESS
MELLITUS
IMPOVERISHMENT
DETERMINANTS
PRIORITIES
GLUCOSE
Bangladesh, NCDs, Comorbidity, Diabetes, Hypertension
Summary Objectives To determine the sex-specific prevalence, inequality and factors associated with healthcare utilisation for diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension and comorbidity among the adult population of Bangladesh.Study design This study analysed cross-sectional nationwide Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey data from 2011. Comorbidity was defined as the coexistence of both DM and hypertension. Several socioeconomic and demographic factors such as age, sex, education, geographic location, administrative division, employment status, education and wealth index were considered as major explanatory variables. Inequality in prevalence and healthcare utilisation was measured using the ‘Lorenz curve’. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were performed to observe the effects of different factors and reported as adjusted ORs (AORs) with 95% CIs. A p value of <0.05 was adopted as the level of statistical significance.Setting The study was conducted in Bangladesh.Participants A total of 7521 adult participants with availability of biomarkers information were included.Results The mean age of the study participants was 51.4 years (SD ±13.0). The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and comorbidity were 29.7%, 11.0% and 4.5% respectively. Socioeconomic inequality was observed in the utilisation of healthcare services. A higher prevalence of hypertension and comorbidity was significantly associated with individuals aged >70 years (AOR 7.0, 95% CI 5.0 to 9.9; AOR 6.7, 95% CI 3.0 to 14.9). The risk of having hypertension, diabetes and comorbidity were significantly higher among more educated, unemployed as well as among individuals from Khulna division.Conclusions The study revealed a rising prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and comorbidity with inequality in service utilisation. A joint effort involving public, private and non-governmental organisations is necessary to ensure improved accessibility in service utilisation and to reduce the disease burden.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029364
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145516

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.