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Changes in inequality of childhood morbidity in Bangladesh 1993-2014: A decomposition analysis

Mahumud, RA, Alam, K, Renzaho, AMN, Sarker, AR, Sultana, M, Sheikh, N, Rawal, LB and Gow, J 2019, Changes in inequality of childhood morbidity in Bangladesh 1993-2014: A decomposition analysis, PLoS ONE, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0218515.

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Title Changes in inequality of childhood morbidity in Bangladesh 1993-2014: A decomposition analysis
Author(s) Mahumud, RA
Alam, K
Renzaho, AMN
Sarker, AR
Sultana, M
Sheikh, N
Rawal, LB
Gow, J
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 14
Issue number 6
Article ID e0218515
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher PLOS
Place of publication San Francisco, CA
Publication date 2019-06-18
ISSN 1932-6203
1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
INFECTIOUS-DISEASE MORBIDITY
SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITY
CHILDREN
HEALTH
MALNUTRITION
DIARRHEA
RISK
COUNTRIES
GOALS
Summary Introduction: Child health remains an important public health concern at the global level, with preventable diseases such as diarrheal disease, acute respiratory infection (ARI) and fever posing a large public health burden in low- and middle-income countries including Bangladesh. Improvements in socio-economic conditions have tended to benefit advantaged groups in societies, which has resulted in widespread inequalities in health outcomes. This study examined how socioeconomic inequality is associated with childhood morbidity in Bangladesh, and identified the factors affecting three illnesses: diarrhea, ARI and fever.Materials and methods: A total of 43,860 sample observations from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, spanning a 22-year period (1993–2014), were analysed. Concentration curve and concentration index methods were used to evaluate changes in the degree of household wealth-related inequalities and related trends in childhood morbidity. Regression-based decomposition analyses were used to attribute the inequality disparities to individual determinants for the three selected causes of childhood morbidity.Results: The overall magnitude of inequality in relation to childhood morbidity has been declining slowly over the 22-year period. The magnitude of socio-economic inequality as a cause of childhood morbidity varied during the period. Decomposition analyses attributed the inequalities to poor maternal education attainment, inadequate pre-delivery care, adverse chronic undernutrition status and low immunisation coverage.Conclusions: High rates of childhood morbidity were observed, although these have declined over time. Socio-economic inequality is strongly associated with childhood morbidity. Socio-economically disadvantaged communities need to be assisted and interventions should emphasise improvements of, and easier access to, health care services. These will be key to improving the health status of children in Bangladesh and should reduce economic inequality through improved health over time.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0218515
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019, Mahumud et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145557

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.