Openly accessible

Auditory fear conditioning alters neural gain in the cochlear nucleus: a wireless neural recording study in freely behaving rats

Paolini, Antonio G, Morgan, Simeon J and Kim, Jee Hyun 2020, Auditory fear conditioning alters neural gain in the cochlear nucleus: a wireless neural recording study in freely behaving rats, Neuronal signaling, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1042/ns20200009.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Auditory fear conditioning alters neural gain in the cochlear nucleus: a wireless neural recording study in freely behaving rats
Author(s) Paolini, Antonio G
Morgan, Simeon J
Kim, Jee HyunORCID iD for Kim, Jee Hyun orcid.org/0000-0002-1299-4300
Journal name Neuronal signaling
Volume number 4
Issue number 4
Article ID NS20200009
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Portland Press Limited
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-12
ISSN 2059-6553
2059-6553
Keyword(s) classical conditioning
cochlear nucleus
electrophysiology
learning and memory
neuroplasticity
rat
Summary Anxiety disorders involve distorted perception of the world including increased saliency of stress-associated cues. However, plasticity in the initial sensory regions of the brain following a fearful experience has never been examined. The cochlear nucleus (CN) is the first station in the central auditory system, with heterogeneous collections of neurons that not only project to but also receive projections from cortico-limbic regions, suggesting a potential for experience-dependent plasticity. Using wireless neural recordings in freely behaving rats, we demonstrate for the first time that neural gain in the CN is significantly altered by fear conditioning to auditory sequences. Specifically, the ventral subnuclei significantly increased firing rate to the conditioned tone sequence, while the dorsal subnuclei significantly decreased firing rate during the conditioning session overall. These findings suggest subregion-specific changes in the balance of inhibition and excitation in the CN as a result of conditioning experience. Heart rate was measured as the conditioned response (CR), which showed that while pre-conditioned stimulus (CS) responding did not change across baseline and conditioning sessions, significant changes in heart rate were observed to the tone sequence followed by shock. Heart-rate findings support acquisition of conditioned fear. Taken together, the present study presents first evidence for potential experience-dependent changes in auditory perception that involve novel plasticity within the first site of processing auditory information in the brain.
Language eng
DOI 10.1042/ns20200009
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145732

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 13 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 08 Dec 2020, 10:02:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.