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Altitude and heat training in preparation for competitions in the heat: A case study

Carr, Amelia, Saunders, PU, Garvican-Lewis, LA and Vallance, BS 2020, Altitude and heat training in preparation for competitions in the heat: A case study, International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, vol. 15, no. 9, pp. 1344-1348, doi: 10.1123/IJSPP.2019-0292.

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Title Altitude and heat training in preparation for competitions in the heat: A case study
Author(s) Carr, AmeliaORCID iD for Carr, Amelia orcid.org/0000-0003-3855-2540
Saunders, PU
Garvican-Lewis, LA
Vallance, BS
Journal name International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume number 15
Issue number 9
Start page 1344
End page 1348
Total pages 5
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Hanover, PA
Publication date 2020-10
ISSN 1555-0265
1555-0273
Keyword(s) hypoxic training
heat acclimation
elite athletes
periodization
Summary Purpose: To quantify, for an elite-level racewalker, altitude training, heat acclimation and acclimatization, physiological data, and race performance from January 2007 to August 2008. Methods: The participant performed 7 blocks of altitude training: 2 “live high:train high” blocks at 1380 m (total = 22 d) and 5 simulated “live high:train low” blocks at 3000 m/600 m (total = 98 d). Prior to the 2007 World Championships and the 2008 Olympic Games, 2 heat-acclimation blocks of ~6 weeks were performed (1 session/week), with ∼2 weeks of heat acclimatization completed immediately prior to each 20-km event. Results: During the observation period, physiological testing included maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, mL·kg−1·min−1), walking speed (km·h−1) at 4 mmol·L−1 blood lactate concentration [La−], body mass (kg), and hemoglobin mass (g), and 12 × 20-km races and 2 × 50-km races were performed. The highest VO2max was 67.0 mL·kg−1·min−1 (August 2007), which improved 3.1% from the first measurement (64.9 mL·kg−1·min−1, June 2007). The highest percentage change in any physiological variable was 7.1%, for 4 mmol·L−1 [La−] walking speed, improving from 14.1 (June 2007) to 15.1 km·h−1 (August 2007). Personal-best times for 20 km improved from (hh:mm:ss) 1:21:36 to 1:19:41 (2.4%) and from 3:55:08 to 3:39:27 (7.1%) in the 50-km event. The participant won Olympic bronze and silver medals in the 20- and 50-km, respectively. Conclusions: Elite racewalkers who regularly perform altitude training may benefit from periodized heat acclimation and acclimatization prior to major international competitions in the heat.
Language eng
DOI 10.1123/IJSPP.2019-0292
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
1116 Medical Physiology
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Human Kinetics, Inc.
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145929

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.