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A Brief Report: Community Supportiveness May Facilitate Participation of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Their Community and Reduce Feelings of Isolation in Their Caregivers

Devenish, Bethany, Sivaratnam, Carmel, Lindor, E, Papadopoulos, Nicole, Wilson, R, McGillivray, Jane and Rinehart, Nicole 2020, A Brief Report: Community Supportiveness May Facilitate Participation of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Their Community and Reduce Feelings of Isolation in Their Caregivers, Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 11, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.583483.

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Title A Brief Report: Community Supportiveness May Facilitate Participation of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Their Community and Reduce Feelings of Isolation in Their Caregivers
Author(s) Devenish, BethanyORCID iD for Devenish, Bethany orcid.org/0000-0001-6772-5186
Sivaratnam, CarmelORCID iD for Sivaratnam, Carmel orcid.org/0000-0002-0841-1344
Lindor, EORCID iD for Lindor, E orcid.org/0000-0001-6935-047X
Papadopoulos, NicoleORCID iD for Papadopoulos, Nicole orcid.org/0000-0001-9057-1672
Wilson, R
McGillivray, JaneORCID iD for McGillivray, Jane orcid.org/0000-0003-2000-6488
Rinehart, NicoleORCID iD for Rinehart, Nicole orcid.org/0000-0001-6109-3958
Journal name Frontiers in Psychology
Volume number 11
Article ID 583483
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-11-10
ISSN 1664-1078
1664-1078
Keyword(s) autism spectral disorder
caregivers
children
community participation
stress
Social Sciences
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
YOUNG-PEOPLE
PARENTS
ENVIRONMENT
ASD
Summary Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) participate at lower rates in their community, and their caregivers experience higher levels of stress, in comparison to families of typically developing (TD) children. The social model of disability positions the environment as the central issue when children with disabilities are unable to participate, yet little is known about the relationship between poor community support, reduced community participation in children with ASD, and caregiver stress. This study examined caregiver perceptions of community supportiveness for the community participation of 48 children with ASD (aged 5–12 years), alongside caregiver-reported child ASD symptom severity, adaptive functioning, and caregiver stress. Community supportiveness predicted child involvement, but not attendance, when child characteristics were held constant. Caregiver perceptions of low community supportiveness significantly predicted caregiver feelings of isolation. The importance of modifying community programs to better support inclusion of children with ASD is discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.583483
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Devenish, Sivaratnam, Lindor, Papadopoulos, Wilson, McGillivray and Rinehart
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145974

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.