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Self-efficacy, support and sustainability – a qualitative study of the experience of establishing breastfeeding for first-time Australian mothers following early discharge

James, Lucy, Sweet, Linda and Donnellan-Fernandez, Roslyn 2020, Self-efficacy, support and sustainability – a qualitative study of the experience of establishing breastfeeding for first-time Australian mothers following early discharge, International breastfeeding journal, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s13006-020-00337-1.

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Title Self-efficacy, support and sustainability – a qualitative study of the experience of establishing breastfeeding for first-time Australian mothers following early discharge
Author(s) James, Lucy
Sweet, LindaORCID iD for Sweet, Linda orcid.org/0000-0003-0605-1186
Donnellan-Fernandez, Roslyn
Journal name International breastfeeding journal
Volume number 15
Issue number 1
Article ID 98
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1746-4358
1746-4358
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Pediatrics
Breastfeeding
Early discharge
Postnatal care
First-time mothers
Breastfeeding support
Self-efficacy
Summary Background Ensuring women receive optimal breastfeeding support is of key importance to the health of mothers and their infants. Early discharge within 24 h of birth is increasingly common across Australia, and the practice of postnatal home visiting varies between settings. The reduction in length of stay without expansion of home visits reduces midwives’ ability to support breastfeeding. The impact of early discharge on first-time mothers establishing breastfeeding was unknown. The study aim was to understand the experiences of first-time Australian mothers establishing breastfeeding when discharged from the hospital within 24 h of a normal vaginal birth. Methods A qualitative interpretive method was used. Semi-structured interviews with 12 women following early discharge were conducted. Data were audio recorded, professionally transcribed, and subjected to a thematic analysis. Results Three interconnected themes of ‘self-efficacy’, ‘support’ and ‘sustainability’ were identified. Self-efficacy influenced the women’s readiness and motivation to be discharged home early and played a role in how some of the mothers overcame breastfeeding challenges. Social, semi-professional and professional breastfeeding supports were key in women’s experiences. Sustainability referred to and describes what women valued in relation to continuation of their breastfeeding journey. Conclusion This study found accessible people-based breastfeeding services in the community are valued following early discharge. Furthermore, there is demand for more evidence-based breastfeeding educational resources, potentially in the form of interactive applications or websites. Additionally, a focus on holistic and individualised breastfeeding assessment and care plans prior to discharge that link women with ongoing breastfeeding services is paramount.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13006-020-00337-1
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1110 Nursing
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30145979

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.