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Social and affective neuroscience: an Australian perspective

Kumfor, Fiona, Tracy, Lincoln M., Wei, Grace, Chen, Yu, Dominguez D., Juan F., Whittle, Sarah, Wearne, Travis and Kelly, Michelle 2020, Social and affective neuroscience: an Australian perspective, Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, vol. 15, no. 9, pp. 965-980, doi: 10.1093/scan/nsaa133.

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Title Social and affective neuroscience: an Australian perspective
Author(s) Kumfor, Fiona
Tracy, Lincoln M.
Wei, Grace
Chen, Yu
Dominguez D., Juan F.
Whittle, Sarah
Wearne, Travis
Kelly, Michelle
Journal name Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Volume number 15
Issue number 9
Start page 965
End page 980
Total pages 16
Publisher Oxford University Press (OUP)
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2020-09-30
ISSN 1749-5016
1749-5024
Keyword(s) affective neuroscience
social cognition
social cognitive neuroscience
social neuroscience
Summary While research in social and affective neuroscience has a long history, it is only in the last few decades that it has been truly established as an independent field of investigation. In the Australian region, despite having an even shorter history, this field of research is experiencing a dramatic rise. In this review, we present recent findings from a survey conducted on behalf of the Australasian Society for Social and Affective Neuroscience (AS4SAN) and from an analysis of the field to highlight contributions and strengths from our region (with a focus on Australia). Our results demonstrate that researchers in this field draw on a broad range of techniques, with the most common being behavioural experiments and neuropsychological assessment, as well as structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging. The Australian region has a particular strength in clinically driven research, evidenced by the types of populations under investigation, top cited papers from the region, and funding sources. We propose that the Australian region has potential to contribute to cross-cultural research and facilitating data sharing, and that improved links with international leaders will continue to strengthen this burgeoning field.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/scan/nsaa133
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146045

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.