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Ranking of meal preferences and interactions with demographic characteristics: A discrete choice experiment in young adults

Livingstone, Katherine, Lamb, Karen, Abbott, Gavin, Worsley, Tony and McNaughton, Sarah 2020, Ranking of meal preferences and interactions with demographic characteristics: A discrete choice experiment in young adults, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12966-020-01059-7.

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Title Ranking of meal preferences and interactions with demographic characteristics: A discrete choice experiment in young adults
Author(s) Livingstone, KatherineORCID iD for Livingstone, Katherine orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
Lamb, KarenORCID iD for Lamb, Karen orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
Abbott, GavinORCID iD for Abbott, Gavin orcid.org/0000-0003-4014-0705
Worsley, Tony
McNaughton, SarahORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 17
Issue number 1
Article ID 157
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-12-01
ISSN 1479-5868
1479-5868
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
Discrete choice experiment
Food preferences
Meal preferences
Barriers
Healthy eating
Dietary patterns
Eating behaviours
Young adults
Online survey
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
CONSUMER PREFERENCES
HEALTH
PROMOTION
ASSOCIATION
BEHAVIORS
VALIDITY
OBESITY
PRICES
Summary Background: The diet of young adults is poor, yet little is known about the relative importance of influences on healthy eating in a decision-making context. The aim of this exploratory study was to understand the relative ranking of influences on meal choices in young adults and to investigate interactions between meal preferences and demographic and health characteristics. Methods: Adults aged 18–30 years (n = 92, mean age: 23.9 (SD 3.4) years) completed an online discrete choice experiment. Participants were presented with 12 choice sets reflecting a typical weekday meal and were asked to choose between four meal options. Each meal consisted of a combination of five meal attributes (preparation time, cost, taste, familiarity and nutrition content) that each had three attribute levels. Data were analysed using conditional logit models. Subgroup analyses were performed by sex, education, income, weight status and meeting fruit and vegetable recommendations. Results: Comparing the highest and lowest attribute levels, meal preferences were higher for better taste (B = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.63), familiarity (B = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.54) and nutrition content (B = 1.11; 95% CI: 0.81, 1.41) and lower for increased preparation times (B = −0.33; 95% CI: − 0.53, − 0.12) and cost (B = −0.50; 95% CI: − 0.75, − 0.24). Nutrition content was the most important influence on meal choice. Cost was the second most important, followed by taste, familiarity and preparation time. Compared to males, females had a higher preference for better nutrition content, taste and familiarity and a lower preference for increased cost. Higher educated participants had a higher preference for better nutrition content, familiarity and taste compared to lower educated participants. Young adults who met recommendations for fruit and vegetable intake had a higher preference for better nutrition content compared to participants who did not meet recommendations. Conclusion: Nutrition content was the most important influence on young adults’ meal choices, followed by cost, taste, familiarity and preparation time. Preferences varied by demographics and health characteristics, suggesting that the focus of dietary interventions may benefit from being tailored to specific young adult groups.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01059-7
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146054

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.