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Psychosocial job characteristics and mental health: Do associations differ by migrant status in an Australian working population sample?

Liu, Xiaomin, Bowe, Steven J., Li, Lin, Too, Lay San and LaMontagne, Anthony D. 2020, Psychosocial job characteristics and mental health: Do associations differ by migrant status in an Australian working population sample?, PLoS ONE, vol. 15, no. 11, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0242906.

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Title Psychosocial job characteristics and mental health: Do associations differ by migrant status in an Australian working population sample?
Author(s) Liu, Xiaomin
Bowe, Steven J.ORCID iD for Bowe, Steven J. orcid.org/0000-0003-3813-842X
Li, Lin
Too, Lay San
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 15
Issue number 11
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher PLOS
Place of publication San Francisco, CA
Publication date 2020-11-30
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Jobs
Mental health and psychiatry
Psychological and psychosocial issues
Educational attainment
Labor mobility
Language
Australia
Public and occupational health
Summary Migrant workers may experience higher burdens of occupational injury and illness compared to native-born workers, which may be due to the differential exposure to occupational hazards, differential vulnerability to exposure-associated health impacts, or both. This study aims to assess if the relationships between psychosocial job characteristics and mental health vary by migrant status in Australia (differential vulnerability). A total of 8969 persons from wave 14 (2014–2015) of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey were included in the analysis. Psychosocial job characteristics included skill discretion, decision authority and job insecurity. Mental health was assessed via a Mental Health Inventory-5 score (MHI-5), with a higher score indicating better mental health. Migrant status was defined by (i) country of birth (COB), (ii) the combination of COB and English/Non-English dominant language of COB and (iii) the combination of COB and years since arrival in Australia. Data were analysed using linear regression, adjusting for gender, age and educational attainment. Migrant status was analysed as an effect modifier of the relationships between psychosocial job characteristics and mental health. Skill discretion and decision authority were positively associated with the MHI-5 score while job insecurity was negatively associated with the MHI-5 score. We found no statistical evidence of migrant status acting as an effect modifier of the psychosocial job characteristic―MHI-5 relationships. With respect to psychosocial job characteristic―mental health relationships, these results suggest that differential exposure to job stressors is a more important mechanism than differential vulnerability for generating occupational health inequities between migrants and native-born workers in Australia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0242906
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Liu et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146077

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.