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The feasibility of implementing high-intensity interval training in cardiac rehabilitation settings: A retrospective analysis

Way, Kimberley, Vidal-Almela, S, Keast, ML, Hans, H, Pipe, AL and Reed, JL 2020, The feasibility of implementing high-intensity interval training in cardiac rehabilitation settings: A retrospective analysis, BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s13102-020-00186-9.

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Title The feasibility of implementing high-intensity interval training in cardiac rehabilitation settings: A retrospective analysis
Author(s) Way, KimberleyORCID iD for Way, Kimberley orcid.org/0000-0002-1999-2498
Vidal-Almela, S
Keast, ML
Hans, H
Pipe, AL
Reed, JL
Journal name BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume number 12
Issue number 1
Article ID 38
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-06-29
ISSN 2052-1847
Keyword(s) Cardiovascular disease
Exercise
High-intensity interval training
Feasibility
Adherence
Safety
Summary Background: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Notwithstanding the well-known benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), adherence to CR remains low, particularly in women. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has received specific attention as an emerging exercise-training paradigm that addresses frequently cited barriers to CR (i.e. lack of motivation/enjoyment and time, perceiving exercise regime as tiring/boring) and improves cardiovascular risk factors. Previous studies have examined the safety of HIIT in CR; there is little evidence on the feasibility of HIIT in CR. The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of HIIT within a CR setting and examine the sex differences regarding the feasibility of such programming. Methods: Patients attended an on-site HIIT CR program (10-min warm-up, 25 min of interspersed high-intensity [HI - 4 min at 85–95% HRpeak] and lower intensity [LO - 3 min at 60–70% HRpeak] intervals, 10-min cool-down) twice weekly for 10 weeks. Heart rate (HR) and the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale (6–20 points) were recorded at each session. Feasibility was assessed by: [1] attendance and compliance: the number of sessions attended and the compliance to the prescribed HI and LO HR ranges; [2] the patient experience: patients’ perceived effort, program difficulty, if the program was challenging and satisfying; and, [3] safety. Descriptive statistics were used to report the means and their variations. Mann-Whitney U tests and Chi-square analyses were performed to examine sex-differences. Results: A total of 151 patients (33% women, 57.5 ± 9.1 years) attended the HIIT program and completed 16 ± 5 classes with a low attrition rate (11.3%). Most patients met or exceeded the prescribed target HR for the HI (80%) and LO (84%) intervals, respectively. Patients reported a “somewhat hard” RPE for HI (14 ± 2 points) and “very light” for LO (10 ± 2 points) intervals. All patients were satisfied with the program and found it challenging. Most patients found HIIT to be difficult (7 ± 2 points, scale range 0–10 points), yet safe (97%). Three vasovagal episodes occurred and more women dropped-out of the program than men (p < 0.01). Conclusions: HIIT is a feasible, safe and well-received exercise paradigm in a CR setting.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13102-020-00186-9
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146171

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.