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Fruit and vegetable knowledge and intake within an Australian population: The AusDiab study

Hill, CR, Blekkenhorst, LC, Radavelli-Bagatini, S, Sim, M, Woodman, RJ, Devine, A, Shaw, JE, Hodgson, JM, Daly, Robin and Lewis, JR 2020, Fruit and vegetable knowledge and intake within an Australian population: The AusDiab study, Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 12, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.3390/nu12123628.

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Title Fruit and vegetable knowledge and intake within an Australian population: The AusDiab study
Author(s) Hill, CR
Blekkenhorst, LC
Radavelli-Bagatini, S
Sim, M
Woodman, RJ
Devine, A
Shaw, JE
Hodgson, JM
Daly, RobinORCID iD for Daly, Robin orcid.org/0000-0002-9897-1598
Lewis, JR
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 12
Issue number 12
Article ID 3628
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-11-25
ISSN 2072-6643
2072-6643
Keyword(s) diet
eating
fruit
health promotion
literacy
questionnaire
survey
vegetables
Summary Understanding the relationship between fruit and vegetable knowledge (FVK) and fruit and vegetable intake (FVI) is an important consideration for improved public health and successful targeting of health promotion messaging. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between FVK and FVI in Australian adults and to identify subgroups most at risk of poor knowledge. Using data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab), we investigated associations between FVK and FVI, as well as demographic and lifestyle factors. Baseline FVK was measured using two self-reported questions. FVI was assessed using a validated, self-reported, food frequency questionnaire in 1999/00 (baseline), 2004/05, and 2011/12. Amongst the 8966 participants assessed at baseline, 24.1% had adequate, 73.0% had insufficient, and 2.9% had poor FVK. Using linear regression, those with insufficient or poor FVK reported significantly lower FVI (grams/day) compared to those with adequate FVK: baseline (coefficient (95%CI)): −67.1 (−80.0, −54.3) and −124.0 (−142.9, −105.1), respectively, whilst, at 12 years, the differences were −42.5 (−54.6, −30.5) and −94.6 (−133.8, −55.5) grams/day, respectively (all p < 0.001). Poor FVK was more likely to be reported in males, older individuals (>65 years), socio-economically disadvantaged, smokers, and those with insufficient physical activity/sedentary behavior. We demonstrate that having adequate knowledge of FVI, defined as knowing to consume fruit and vegetables several times a day for a well-balanced diet, is strongly associated with FVI, with several demographic and lifestyle factors predicting FVK. Health promotion messages aimed at increasing FVK should target these subgroups for maximal effect.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu12123628
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146200

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.