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Foraging niche overlap during chick-rearing in the sexually dimorphic Westland petrel

Poupart, Timothee, Waugh, SM, Kato, A and Arnould, John 2020, Foraging niche overlap during chick-rearing in the sexually dimorphic Westland petrel, Royal Society Open Science, vol. 7, no. 11, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1098/rsos.191511.

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Title Foraging niche overlap during chick-rearing in the sexually dimorphic Westland petrel
Author(s) Poupart, Timothee
Waugh, SM
Kato, A
Arnould, JohnORCID iD for Arnould, John orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name Royal Society Open Science
Volume number 7
Issue number 11
Article ID 191511
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Royal Society
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-11-25
ISSN 2054-5703
2054-5703
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
foraging behaviour
sexual dimorphism
niche segregation
Westland petrel
New Zealand
WHITE-CHINNED PETRELS
PROCELLARIA-WESTLANDICA
SIZE DIMORPHISM
STABLE-ISOTOPES
SUBTROPICAL SEABIRD
SEASONAL MOVEMENTS
MARINE PREDATORS
ACTIVITY BUDGETS
DIVING BEHAVIOR
FEEDING ECOLOGY
Summary Most Procellariform seabirds are pelagic, breed in summer when prey availability peaks, and migrate for winter. They also display a dual foraging strategy (short and long trips) and sex-specific foraging. The Westland petrel Procellaria westlandica , a New Zealand endemic, is one of the rare seabirds breeding in winter. Preliminary findings on this large and sexually dimorphic petrel suggest a foraging behaviour with no evidence of a dual strategy, within a narrow range and with shared areas between sexes. To investigate further this unusual strategy, the present study determined the fine-scale at-sea behaviours (global positioning system and accelerometer data loggers) and trophic niches (stable isotopes in whole blood) of chick-rearing individuals (16 males and 13 females). All individuals foraged on the shelf-slope of the west coast of New Zealand's South Island with short, unimodal trips. Both sexes foraged at similar intensity without temporal, spatial or isotopic niche segregation. These findings suggest the presence of a winter prey resource close to the colony, sufficient to satisfy the nutritional needs of breeding without increasing the foraging effort or intra-specific competition avoidance during winter. Additional data are needed to assess the consistency of foraging niche between the sexes and its reproductive outcomes in view of anticipated environmental changes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rsos.191511
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146476

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.