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Temporal and spatial differences in the post-breeding behaviour of a ubiquitous Southern Hemisphere seabird, the common diving petrel: Variation in post-breeding behaviour

Fromant, Aymeric, Bost, CA, Bustamante, P, Carravieri, A, Cherel, Y, Delord, K, Eizenberg, YH, Miskelly, CM and Arnould, John 2020, Temporal and spatial differences in the post-breeding behaviour of a ubiquitous Southern Hemisphere seabird, the common diving petrel: Variation in post-breeding behaviour, Royal Society Open Science, vol. 7, no. 11, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1098/rsos.200670.

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Title Temporal and spatial differences in the post-breeding behaviour of a ubiquitous Southern Hemisphere seabird, the common diving petrel: Variation in post-breeding behaviour
Author(s) Fromant, Aymeric
Bost, CA
Bustamante, P
Carravieri, A
Cherel, Y
Delord, K
Eizenberg, YH
Miskelly, CM
Arnould, JohnORCID iD for Arnould, John orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name Royal Society Open Science
Volume number 7
Issue number 11
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Royal Society
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-11-18
ISSN 2054-5703
Keyword(s) migration
non-breeding
moult
stable isotopes
Procellariiformes
Southern Ocean
Summary The non-breeding period plays a major role in seabird survival and population dynamics. However, our understanding of the migratory behaviour, moulting and feeding strategies of non-breeding seabirds is still very limited, especially for small-sized species. The present study investigated the post-breeding behaviour of three distant populations (Kerguelen Archipelago, southeastern Australia, New Zealand) of the common diving petrel (CDP) (Pelecanoides urinatrix), an abundant, widely distributed zooplanktivorous seabird breeding throughout the southern Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans. The timing, geographical destination and activity pattern of birds were quantified through geolocator deployments during the post-breeding migration, while moult pattern of body feathers was investigated using stable isotope analysis. Despite the high energetic cost of flapping flight, all the individuals quickly travelled long distances (greater than approx. 2500 km) after the end of the breeding season, targeting oceanic frontal systems. The three populations, however, clearly diverged spatially (migration pathways and destinations), and temporally (timing and duration) in their post-breeding movements, as well as in their period of moult. Philopatry to distantly separated breeding grounds, different breeding phenologies and distinct post-breeding destinations suggest that the CDP populations have a high potential for isolation, and hence, speciation. These results contribute to improving knowledge of ecological divergence and evolution between populations, and inform the challenges of conserving migratory species.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rsos.200670
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146496

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.