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Human proximity suppresses fish recruitment by altering mangrove-associated odour cues

Brooker, R, Seyfferth, AL, Hunter, A, Sneed, JM, Dixson, DL and Hay, ME 2020, Human proximity suppresses fish recruitment by altering mangrove-associated odour cues, Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-77722-7.

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Title Human proximity suppresses fish recruitment by altering mangrove-associated odour cues
Author(s) Brooker, RORCID iD for Brooker, R orcid.org/0000-0001-8739-6914
Seyfferth, AL
Hunter, A
Sneed, JM
Dixson, DL
Hay, ME
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Article ID 21091
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2020-12-03
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Summary Human-driven threats to coastal marine communities could potentially affect chemically mediated behaviours that have evolved to facilitate crucial ecological processes. Chemical cues and their importance remain inadequately understood in marine systems, but cues from coastal vegetation can provide sensory information guiding aquatic animals to key resources or habitats. In the tropics, mangroves are a ubiquitous component of healthy coastal ecosystems, associated with a range of habitats from river mouths to coral reefs. Because mangrove leaf litter is a predictable cue to coastal habitats, chemical information from mangrove leaves could provide a source of settlement cues for coastal fishes, drawing larvae towards shallow benthic habitats or inducing settlement. In choice assays, juvenile fishes from the Caribbean (Belize) and Indo-Pacific (Fiji) were attracted to cues from mangroves leaves and were more attracted to cues from mangroves distant from human settlement. In the field, experimental reefs supplemented with mangrove leaves grown away from humans attracted more fish recruits from a greater diversity of species than reefs supplemented with leaves grown near humans. Together, this suggests that human use of coastal areas alters natural chemical cues, negatively affecting the behavioural responses of larval fishes and potentially suppressing recruitment. Overall, our findings highlight the critical links that exist between marine and terrestrial habitats, and the importance of considering these in the broader conservation and management of coastal ecosystems.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-77722-7
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146538

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