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Two-year follow up of a cluster randomised controlled trial for women experiencing intimate partner violence: Effect of screening and family doctor-delivered counselling on quality of life, mental and physical health and abuse exposure

Hegarty, K, Valpied, J, Taft, A, Brown, SJ, Gold, Lisa, Gunn, J and O'Doherty, L 2020, Two-year follow up of a cluster randomised controlled trial for women experiencing intimate partner violence: Effect of screening and family doctor-delivered counselling on quality of life, mental and physical health and abuse exposure, BMJ Open, vol. 10, no. 12, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-034295.

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Title Two-year follow up of a cluster randomised controlled trial for women experiencing intimate partner violence: Effect of screening and family doctor-delivered counselling on quality of life, mental and physical health and abuse exposure
Author(s) Hegarty, K
Valpied, J
Taft, A
Brown, SJ
Gold, LisaORCID iD for Gold, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0002-2733-900X
Gunn, J
O'Doherty, L
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 10
Issue number 12
Article ID e034295
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-12-10
ISSN 2044-6055
2044-6055
Keyword(s) clinical trials
general medicine (see internal medicine)
medical education & training
mental health
primary care
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
medical education &
training
ATTENDING GENERAL-PRACTICE
PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CARE
WEAVE
INTERVENTIONS
DEPRESSION
READINESS
SUPPORT
Summary Objectives: This was a 2-year follow-up study of a primary care-based counselling intervention (weave) for women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). We aimed to assess whether differences in depression found at 12 months (lower depression for intervention than control participants) would be sustained at 24 months and differences in quality in life, general mental and physical health and IPV would emerge. Design: Cluster randomised controlled trial. Researchers blinded to allocation. Unit of randomisation: family doctors. Setting: Fifty-two primary care clinics, Victoria, Australia. Participants: Baseline: 272 English-speaking, female patients (intervention n=137, doctors=35; control n=135, doctors=37), who screened positive for fear of partner in past 12 months. Twenty-four-month response rates: intervention 59% (81/137), control 63% (85/135). Interventions: Intervention doctors received training to deliver brief, woman-centred counselling. Intervention patients were invited to receive this counselling (uptake rate: 49%). Control doctors received standard IPV information; delivered usual care. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Twenty-four months primary outcomes: WHO Quality of Life-Bref dimensions, Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental health. Secondary outcomes: SF-12 physical health and caseness for depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale), post-traumatic stress disorder (Check List-Civilian), IPV (Composite Abuse Scale), physical symptoms (≥6 in last month). Data collected through postal survey. Mixed-effects regressions adjusted for location (rural/urban) and clustering. Results: No differences detected between groups on quality of life (physical: 1.5, 95% CI −2.9 to 5.9; psychological: −0.2, 95% CI −4.8 to 4.4,; social: −1.4, 95% CI −8.2 to 5.4; environmental: −0.8, 95% CI −4.0 to 2.5), mental health status (−1.6, 95% CI −5.3 to 2.1) or secondary outcomes. Both groups improved on primary outcomes, IPV, anxiety. Conclusions: Intervention was no more effective than usual care in improving 2-year quality of life, mental and physical health and IPV, despite differences in depression at 12 months. Future refinement and testing of type, duration and intensity of primary care IPV interventions is needed. Trial registration number: ACTRN12608000032358.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-034295
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146687

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.