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Quantification of the dislocation density, size, and volume fraction of precipitates in deep cryogenically treated martensitic steels

Antony, Ajesh, Schmerl, Natalya M., Sokolova, Anna, Mahjoub, Reza, Fabijanic, Daniel and Stanford, Nikki E. 2020, Quantification of the dislocation density, size, and volume fraction of precipitates in deep cryogenically treated martensitic steels, Metals, vol. 10, no. 11, doi: 10.3390/met10111561.

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Title Quantification of the dislocation density, size, and volume fraction of precipitates in deep cryogenically treated martensitic steels
Author(s) Antony, Ajesh
Schmerl, Natalya M.
Sokolova, Anna
Mahjoub, Reza
Fabijanic, DanielORCID iD for Fabijanic, Daniel orcid.org/0000-0003-4857-0398
Stanford, Nikki E.
Journal name Metals
Volume number 10
Issue number 11
Total pages 25
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-11
ISSN 2075-4701
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Technology
Materials Science, Multidisciplinary
Metallurgy & Metallurgical Engineering
Materials Science
martensite
tempering
cryogenic treatment
small angle scattering
atom probe tomography
X-ray diffraction
HIGH-SPEED STEEL
WEAR-RESISTANCE
MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES
TOOL STEEL
X-RAY
MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTION
TRIBOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR
CARBIDE PRECIPITATION
MAGNETIC-PROPERTIES
CARBON
Summary Two groups of martensitic alloys were examined for changes induced by deep cryogenic treatment (DCT). The first group was a range of binary and ternary compositions with 0.6 wt % carbon, and the second group was a commercial AISI D2 tool steel. X-ray diffraction showed that DCT made two changes to the microstructure: retained austenite was transformed to martensite, and the dislocation density of the martensite was increased. This increase in dislocation density was consistent for all alloys, including those that did not undergo phase transformation during DCT. It is suggested that the increase in dislocation density may be caused by local differences in thermal expansion within the heterogeneous martensitic structure. Then, samples were tempered, and the cementite size distribution was examined using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and atom probe tomography. First principles calculations confirmed that all magnetic scattering originated in cementite and not carbon clusters. Quantitative SANS analysis showed a measurable change in cementite size distribution for all alloys as a result of prior DCT. It is proposed that the increase in dislocation density that results from DCT modifies the cementite precipitation through enhanced diffusion rates and increased cementite nucleation sites.
Notes This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat Treatment and Mechanical Properties of Metals and Alloys
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/met10111561
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0914 Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30146849

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
GTP Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.