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Skeletal muscle health and cognitive function: a narrative review

Sui, Sophia X., Williams, Lana J., Holloway-Kew, Kara L., Hyde, Natalie K. and Pasco, Julie A. 2021, Skeletal muscle health and cognitive function: a narrative review, International journal of molecular sciences, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 1-22, doi: 10.3390/ijms22010255.

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Title Skeletal muscle health and cognitive function: a narrative review
Author(s) Sui, Sophia X.
Williams, Lana J.ORCID iD for Williams, Lana J. orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Holloway-Kew, Kara L.
Hyde, Natalie K.ORCID iD for Hyde, Natalie K. orcid.org/0000-0002-0693-2904
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Journal name International journal of molecular sciences
Volume number 22
Issue number 1
Article ID 255
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1661-6596
1422-0067
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physical Sciences
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Chemistry, Multidisciplinary
Chemistry
skeletal muscle health
sarcopenia
cognitive function
dementia
cognitive decline
cognitive impairment
vitamin D
inflammation
oxidative stress
lifestyle risk factors
GAIT SPEED DECLINE
OLDER-ADULTS
BODY-COMPOSITION
ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
GRIP STRENGTH
ELDERLY-WOMEN
VITAMIN-D
INFLAMMATORY MARKERS
EXECUTIVE FUNCTION
HANDGRIP STRENGTH
Summary Sarcopenia is the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with advancing age. It involves both complex genetic and modifiable risk factors, such as lack of exercise, malnutrition and reduced neurological drive. Cognitive decline refers to diminished or impaired mental and/or intellectual functioning. Contracting skeletal muscle is a major source of neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which regulate synapses in the brain. Furthermore, skeletal muscle activity has important immune and redox effects that modify brain function and reduce muscle catabolism. The identification of common risk factors and underlying mechanisms for sarcopenia and cognition may allow the development of targeted interventions that slow or reverse sarcopenia and also certain forms of cognitive decline. However, the links between cognition and skeletal muscle have not been elucidated fully. This review provides a critical appraisal of the literature on the relationship between skeletal muscle health and cognition. The literature suggests that sarcopenia and cognitive decline share pathophysiological pathways. Ageing plays a role in both skeletal muscle deterioration and cognitive decline. Furthermore, lifestyle risk factors, such as physical inactivity, poor diet and smoking, are common to both disorders, so their potential role in the muscle–brain relationship warrants investigation.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijms22010255
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0399 Other Chemical Sciences
0604 Genetics
0699 Other Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147048

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.