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The association between diet and hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review

George, Elena S, Sood, Surbhi, Broughton, Anna, Cogan, Georgia, Hickey, Megan, Chan, Wai San, Sudan, Sonal and Nicoll, Amanda J 2021, The association between diet and hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review, Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-23, doi: 10.3390/nu13010172.

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Title The association between diet and hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review
Author(s) George, Elena SORCID iD for George, Elena S orcid.org/0000-0002-1385-2371
Sood, Surbhi
Broughton, Anna
Cogan, Georgia
Hickey, Megan
Chan, Wai San
Sudan, Sonal
Nicoll, Amanda J
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Article ID 172
Start page 1
End page 23
Total pages 23
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-01
ISSN 2072-6643
2072-6643
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
hepatocellular carcinoma
primary liver cancer
liver cancer
diet
dietary patterns
nutrition
Summary Globally, liver cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer mortality, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) being the most common type of primary liver cancer. Emerging evidence states that diet is recognised as a potential lifestyle-related risk factor for the development of HCC. The aim of this systematic review is to determine whether there is an association between diet and the development of HCC. Using the PRISMA guidelines, three databases (MEDLINE Complete, CINAHL and Embase) were systematically searched, and studies published until July 2020 were included. Thirty observational studies were selected. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42019135240). Higher adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern, Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010, the Urban Prudent Dietary Pattern, the Traditional Cantonese Dietary Pattern, intake of vegetables, wholegrains, fish, poultry, coffee, macronutrients such as monounsaturated fats and micronutrients such as vitamin E, vitamin B9, β-carotene, manganese and potassium were associated with a reduced risk of HCC. The results suggest a potential role of diet in the development of HCC. Further quantitative research needs to be undertaken within a range of populations to investigate diet and the relationship with HCC risk.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu13010172
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147242

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.