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Dynapenia and Low Cognition: A Cross-Sectional Association in Postmenopausal Women

Pasco, Julie A., Stuart, Amanda L., Sui, Sophia X., Holloway-Kew, Kara L., Hyde, Natalie K., Tembo, Monica C., Rufus-Membere Pamela, Kotowicz, Mark A. and Williams, Lana J. 2021, Dynapenia and Low Cognition: A Cross-Sectional Association in Postmenopausal Women, Journal of Clinical Medicine, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.3390/jcm10020173.

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Title Dynapenia and Low Cognition: A Cross-Sectional Association in Postmenopausal Women
Author(s) Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Stuart, Amanda L.ORCID iD for Stuart, Amanda L. orcid.org/0000-0001-8770-9511
Sui, Sophia X.ORCID iD for Sui, Sophia X. orcid.org/0000-0001-6388-1261
Holloway-Kew, Kara L.ORCID iD for Holloway-Kew, Kara L. orcid.org/0000-0001-5064-2990
Hyde, Natalie K.ORCID iD for Hyde, Natalie K. orcid.org/0000-0002-0693-2904
Tembo, Monica C.ORCID iD for Tembo, Monica C. orcid.org/0000-0003-1210-2437
Rufus-Membere Pamela
Kotowicz, Mark A.ORCID iD for Kotowicz, Mark A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8094-1411
Williams, Lana J.ORCID iD for Williams, Lana J. orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Journal name Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume number 10
Issue number 2
Article ID 173
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-01-06
ISSN 2077-0383
2077-0383
Keyword(s) brain-body cross-talk
cognition
muscle strength
older persons
sarcopenia
Summary Dynapenia is a key contributor to physical frailty. Cognitive impairment and dementia accompany frailty, yet links between skeletal muscle and neurocognition are poorly understood. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between lower limb muscle strength and global cognitive function. Participants were 127 women aged 51–87 years, from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Peak eccentric strength of the hip-flexors and hip abductors was determined using a hand-held dynamometer, and dynapenia identified as muscle strength t-scores < −1. Cognition was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and MMSE scores below the median were rated as low. Associations between dynapenia and low cognition were examined using logistic regression models. Hip-flexor dynapenia was detected in 38 (71.7%) women with low cognition and 36 (48.7%) with good cognition (p = 0.009); for hip abductor dynapenia, the pattern was similar (21 (39.6%) vs. 9 (12.2%); p < 0.001). While the observed difference for hip-flexor strength was attenuated after adjusting for age and height (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR) 1.95, 95%CI 0.86–4.41), low cognition was nearly 4-fold more likely in association with hip abductor dynapenia (adjusted OR 3.76, 95%CI 1.44–9.83). No other confounders were identified. Our data suggest that low strength of the hip abductors and low cognition are associated and this could be a consequence of poor muscle function contributing to cognitive decline or vice versa. As muscle weakness is responsive to physical interventions, this warrants further investigation.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jcm10020173
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30147262

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.