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Self-Organized Crowd Dynamics: Research on Earthquake Emergency Response Patterns of Drill-Trained Individuals Based on GIS and Multi-Agent Systems Methodology

Sun, H, Hu, L, Shou, W and Wang, Jun 2021, Self-Organized Crowd Dynamics: Research on Earthquake Emergency Response Patterns of Drill-Trained Individuals Based on GIS and Multi-Agent Systems Methodology, Sensors, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 1-23, doi: 10.3390/s21041353.

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Title Self-Organized Crowd Dynamics: Research on Earthquake Emergency Response Patterns of Drill-Trained Individuals Based on GIS and Multi-Agent Systems Methodology
Author(s) Sun, H
Hu, L
Shou, W
Wang, Jun
Journal name Sensors
Volume number 21
Issue number 4
Start page 1
End page 23
Total pages 23
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-02-14
ISSN 1424-8220
1424-8220
Keyword(s) evacuation pattern
crowd dynamics
drill-trained
panic effect
exit choice
Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Technology
Chemistry, Analytical
Engineering, Electrical & Electronic
Instruments & Instrumentation
Chemistry
Engineering
Summary Predicting evacuation patterns is useful in emergency management situations such as an earthquake. To find out how pre-trained individuals interact with one another to achieve their own goal to reach the exit as fast as possible firstly, we investigated urban people’s evacuation behavior under earthquake disaster coditions, established crowd response rules in emergencies, and described the drill strategy and exit familiarity quantitatively through a cellular automata model. By setting different exit familiarity ratios, simulation experiments under different strategies were conducted to predict people’s reactions before an emergency. The corresponding simulation results indicated that the evacuees’ training level could affect a multi-exit zone’s evacuation pattern and clearance time. Their exit choice preferences may disrupt the exit options’ balance, leading to congestion in some of the exits. Secondly, due to people’s rejection of long distances, congestion, and unfamiliar exits, some people would hesitant about the evacuation direction during the evacuation process. This hesitation would also significantly reduce the overall evacuation efficiency. Finally, taking a community in Zhuhai City, China, as an example, put forward the best urban evacuation drill strategy. The quantitative relation between exit familiar level and evacuation efficiency was obtained. The final results showed that the optimized evacuation plan could improve evacuation’s overall efficiency through the self-organization effect. These studies may have some impact on predicting crowd behavior during evacuation and designing the evacuation plan.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/s21041353
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0301 Analytical Chemistry
0805 Distributed Computing
0906 Electrical and Electronic Engineering
0502 Environmental Science and Management
0602 Ecology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2021, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30148666

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.