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Phenolic profiling of five different Australian grown apples

Li, Heng, Subbiah, Vigasini, Barrow, Colin J., Dunshea, Frank R. and Suleria, Hafiz A. R. 2021, Phenolic profiling of five different Australian grown apples, Applied Sciences, vol. 11, no. 5, doi: 10.3390/app11052421.

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Title Phenolic profiling of five different Australian grown apples
Author(s) Li, Heng
Subbiah, Vigasini
Barrow, Colin J.ORCID iD for Barrow, Colin J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2153-7267
Dunshea, Frank R.
Suleria, Hafiz A. R.ORCID iD for Suleria, Hafiz A. R. orcid.org/0000-0002-2450-0830
Journal name Applied Sciences
Volume number 11
Issue number 5
Article ID 2421
Total pages 21
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-03-09
ISSN 2076-3417
Keyword(s) apple
royal gala
pink lady
red delicious
smitten
fuji
phenolic compounds
antioxidant activity
LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS
HPLC
Summary Apples (Malus domestica) are one of the most widely grown and consumed fruits in the world that contain abundant phenolic compounds that possess remarkable antioxidant potential. The current study characterised phenolic compounds from five different varieties of Australian grown apples (Royal Gala, Pink Lady, Red Delicious, Fuji and Smitten) using LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS and quantified through HPLC-PDA. The phenolic content and antioxidant potential were determined using various assays. Red Delicious had the highest total phenolic (121.78 ± 3.45 mg/g fw) and total flavonoid content (101.23 ± 3.75 mg/g fw) among the five apple samples. In LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS analysis, a total of 97 different phenolic compounds were characterised in five apple samples, including Royal Gala (37), Pink Lady (54), Red Delicious (17), Fuji (67) and Smitten (46). In the HPLC quantification, phenolic acid (chlorogenic acid, 15.69 ± 0.09 mg/g fw) and flavonoid (quercetin, 18.96 ± 0.08 mg/g fw) were most abundant in Royal Gala. The obtained results highlight the importance of Australian apple varieties as a rich source of functional compounds with potential bioactivity.
Notes This article belongs to the Special Issue Potential Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/app11052421
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30149139

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.