Deakin University
Browse

File(s) not publicly available

A governance of denial: hate crime in New Zealand and Australia

chapter
posted on 2014-01-01, 00:00 authored by Nicole Asquith
In Australia and New Zealand, the strategies employed by governments to remedy prejudice, intolerance and hatred occur on a continuum; ranging from global mission statements about multiculturalism/ biculturalism, through to the enactment of civil anti-discrimination and anti-vilification legislation. In some jurisdictions, these civil remedies have been extended to criminal codes and sentencing legislation, and enshrined in human rights charters. In the place of a comprehensive outline of each of the nine jurisdictions, case studies from throughout the region are presented as exemplars of the strategies employed and barriers faced in reducing prejudice-related violence.

The differences between the Australian and New Zealand jurisdictions belies a common theme that frames the delay in developing legislative responses to hate crime and the paucity of cases to reach the point at which they begin to establish an agreed set of norms and values about the abhorrence of prejudice and hatred. At most turns—whether political or public rhetoric, or legislative and policy development - there is a frontier denial, minimisation and negation of prejudice and hatred.

History

Title of book

Routledge international handbook on hate crime

Chapter number

15

Pagination

1 - 1

Publisher

Routledge Taylor & Francis Group

Place of publication

London, England

ISBN-13

9780415818902

Language

eng

Publication classification

B1 Book chapter

Copyright notice

2014, Taylor & Francis

Extent

15

Editor/Contributor(s)

N Hall, A Corb, P Giannasi, J Grieve

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC