Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

African Criminologies: Decolonization, Relativism, and Resistance

Version 2 2024-06-04, 04:34
Version 1 2023-01-31, 22:18
chapter
posted on 2024-06-04, 04:34 authored by Ian WarrenIan Warren, Emma RyanEmma Ryan
Abstract This chapter argues that the decolonization of criminology and criminal justice throughout Africa has enormous potential to reshape the static trajectory of the discipline. This is because the central role of criminology in sustaining inherently harmful justice institutions and practices is reflected clearly in lived African experiences that are obscured in knowledge-building practices throughout the Global North. The emphasis in this chapter is on two interconnected problems specific to the colonial and postcolonial conditions in Africa. The first is the gradual shift in the use of the criminal law to suppress political violence and translating these processes into the civilian sphere. The second is the highly selective use of international criminal law to address mass atrocities. For decolonization to be authentic to a wide body of critical African theories, a true epistemic break from knowledges embedded in legal, political, and humanitarian institutions formed in the Global North is required.

History

Chapter number

38

Pagination

C38.S1-C38.S9

ISBN-13

9780197608494

Indigenous content

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologise for any distress that may occur.

Edition

1

Language

English

Publication classification

B1 Book chapter

Extent

39

Editor/Contributor(s)

Sooryamoorthy R, Khalema NE

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Place of publication

Oxford, Eng.

Title of book

The Oxford Handbook of Sociology of Africa

Series

Oxford Academic Handbooks