Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under embargo

Cardiac thrombi and imaging modalities (diagnosis, approach, and follow-up)

chapter
posted on 2024-03-06, 05:42 authored by F Noohi, H Pouraliakbar, A Alizadehasl, K Rezaei-Kalantari, SM Shariful Islam
Cardiac thrombus formation is a frequent complication of numerous diseases, and its embolization can result in significant morbidity and mortality from cerebrovascular or peripheral vascular events. Early thrombus diagnosis impacts embolic event risk stratification and therapeutic decisions. Many imaging modalities have been investigated in the diagnosis of intracardiac thrombi, including transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). The most common and available method for diagnosing intracardiac thrombi is echocardiography; nonetheless, it is limited because intracardiac clots cannot be differentiated from cardiac masses precisely. Although TEE is semiinvasive, it has high sensitivity and specificity for finding posterior and inferior heart thromboses and is particularly efficient for evaluating clots and determining areas of blood stasis (smoke) in the left atrium. By contrast, TTE is noninvasive and can be used for the visualization of thrombi in the ventricles. Nevertheless, it provides limited views of the left ventricular apex and the distal portion of the ascending aorta. CCTA and CMR are well-established alternatives for detecting intracardiac thrombi. These methods require more time and greater resources but may provide improved detection of cardiac thrombi.

History

Pagination

55-83

ISBN-13

9780323849074

Language

eng

Editor/Contributor(s)

Alizadehasl A, Maleki M

Publisher

Elsevier

Place of publication

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Title of book

Multimodal Imaging Atlas of Cardiac Masses

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC