Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Conceal, don't feel: Disability, monstrosity, and the freak in Edward Scissorhands and Frozen

chapter
posted on 2017-01-01, 00:00 authored by Dylan HoldsworthDylan Holdsworth
Cultural and historical constructions of the freak and the monster have been almost invariably tied to disability. Regardless of what the image of the freak or monster comes to represent socially, culturally, politically, economically, or theologically, the tensions between the normative and non-normative body remain its fundamental preoccupation. The anxieties about the non-normative Other are expressed through a variety of affective responses such as fascination, curiosity, disgust, and terror. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the freak became a commodity, something exploitable when put on show. Unlike the freak, the monster elicits only negative affects such as fear, hatred, and/or disgust. As the freak or monster moves from one mode to the other, they evoke myriad affects simultaneously. In Edward Scissorhands, Edward becomes sublime when he sculpts an angel out of ice for the Boggs' Christmas party. While Edward's sublimity is short-lived, Elsa's sublimity enables her to move from monster to freak.

History

Title of book

Affect, emotion, and children's literature : representation and socialisation in texts for children and young adults

Pagination

192 - 206

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Place of publication

London, Eng.

ISBN-13

9781138244672

Language

eng

Publication classification

B1 Book chapter

Editor/Contributor(s)

K Moruzi, Michelle Smith, Elizabeth Bullen

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Keywords

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC