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Media and Ecocultural Identity

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posted on 2023-03-01, 05:14 authored by Gabi MocattaGabi Mocatta, Tema Milstein, José Sotomayor-Castro
The Routledge Handbook of Ecocultural Identity established that all identities are sociocultural and ecological – ranging from destructively anthropocentric to restoratively ecocentric. Understanding ecocultural identities is important to the urgent project of achieving regenerative futures. This chapter illuminates media’s role in reflecting, shaping, and shifting identities, exploring tensions between media functioning to reproduce status quo anthropocentric identities and, conversely, to produce ecocentric identities. To illustrate, the chapter presents four international case studies, including visitor reviews of a marine mammal sanctuary dependent upon a coal-burning power plant in the United States, a blockbuster South African documentary about an octopus’ relations with a human, Indigenous community-based media for transition discourses in Latin American borderlands, and mediatized environmental injustice in Chile leading to widespread protest and emancipatory catastrophism. In investigating a range of media in interaction with different publics and places, the chapter illustrates ecocultural identity mediation’s reproductive and transformative potential. The chapter also questions whether much-needed overarching identity shifts from anthropocentrism to ecocentrism will be driven less by media and more by immediacy – embodied experiences, including extreme droughts, bushfires, floods, and temperatures. Will the ecocultural identity revolution not be televised – if the majority of media is reproducing anthropocentric views?

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Pagination

1-23

Publisher

Routledge

Title of book

Routledge Handbook of Ecomedia Studies

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