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Phineas Gage

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posted on 2002-01-01, 00:00 authored by Malcolm Macmillan
In 1848, as the result of a bizarre accident, Phineas Gage had most of the left frontal lobe of his brain destroyed. Although his surviving the injury by some 11.5 years made him a considerable medical curiosity, it was the changes to his behavior that made him important in the neurosciences. Gage's is actually one of the most important cases in the history of the neurosciences: it revealed for the first time that complex functions might be localized in the brain. Its status is indexed by its still being cited in about two-thirds of all psychology and related neuroscience textbooks and by the fact that studies were still being undertaken some 150 years after the accident to establish which parts of Gage's brain were damaged.

History

Title of book

Encyclopedia of the human brain

Chapter number

52

Pagination

843 - 857

Publisher

Academic Press

Place of publication

San Diego, Calif

ISBN-13

9780122272103

ISBN-10

0122272102

Edition

Volume 3

Language

eng

Publication classification

B1 Book chapter

Copyright notice

2002, Elsevier Science (USA).

Extent

222

Editor/Contributor(s)

V Ramachandran

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