Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Privacy, dataveillance, and crime prevention

chapter
posted on 2014-10-05, 00:00 authored by Darren Palmer, Ian WarrenIan Warren, Peter MillerPeter Miller
Whether privacy is an adequate legal safeguard against intrusive government or private sector activity remains open for further exploration. The criminal law has always imposed limits on the ability of police to enter private premises and seize property associated with criminal activity, while preserving the rights of “mass private” property owners and their agents to selectively exclude people from entering or remaining on their premises. The appropriate balance between these issues and “the right to be let alone” is often determined by judicial rulings in individual cases. However, the balance between a claimant’s personal rights to be free from undue surveillance and the broader public interest in preventing crime or promoting safety is not always clear. New forms of personal data collection and dissemination through ICTs reconfigure the balance between private and public knowledge (Australian Law Reform Commission 2008), while social network analysis is increasingly deployed by law enforcement agencies to detect and prevent crime. Our ongoing research interrogates how the concept of privacy can be reconciled with the growing use of dataveillance, data mining, and social network analysis to prevent crime and antisocial behavior.

History

Title of book

Encyclopedia of social network analysis and mining

Pagination

1353 - 1362

Publisher

Springer

Place of publication

New York, N.Y.

ISBN-13

9781461461692

Language

eng

Publication classification

X Not reportable; D2.1 Reference work

Copyright notice

2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York

Editor/Contributor(s)

R Alhajj, J Rokne

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC