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Protest or propaganda? Psychology and Australian memory of the Great War

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posted on 01.01.2015, 00:00 authored by Carolyn HolbrookCarolyn Holbrook
The psychological turn in Great War remembrance over the past three decades has been noted both internationally and in Australia. However, there has been less recognition of psychological readings of the war dating from the 1930s in the Australian context. This chapter examines early psychological interpretations of the Great War and the meaning that was attributed to them. It shows how this meaning has been transformed over time, as a consequence of the rise of trauma culture. The chapter dis cusses the debate among historians about whether the tendency to conceptualise war in the language of trauma and suffering facilitates its sentimentalisation. It concludes that while the Anzac legend successfully absorbs the language of trauma in contemporary Australia, the meaning attributed to psychological readings of war is always subject to the geo-political context in which it is made.

History

Title of book

Fighting against war: peace activism in the Twentieth Century

Chapter number

15

Pagination

291 - 312

Publisher

Leftbank Press

Place of publication

Melbourne, Vic.

ISBN-13

9780994238986

Language

eng

Publication classification

B Book chapter; B1.1 Book chapter

Copyright notice

2015, Leftbank Press

Extent

16

Editor/Contributor(s)

P Deery, J Kimber

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