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Reflections on teaching business ethics

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posted on 2012-01-01, 00:00 authored by Ambika Zutshi, Greg WoodGreg Wood, Leanne Morris
The start of the twenty-first century witnessed a number of company scandals and ethical breaches that have brought to the forefront community feelings of anguish and disgust towards large companies in addition to spawning more legislation aimed at avoiding a repeat of these collapses. The question that arises is whether the past measures (including legislation) have worked, given the recent Global Financial Crisis (GFC) as it has raised more questions than it has answered. Against this backdrop, we need to consider whether business ethics can be taught to a person irrespective of their age? Should we as community members, customers, shareholders of today give up on the current senior managers who are mostly representatives of the baby boomers and concentrate on increasing ethical awareness of our current undergraduate students (at least of Generation Y and Z)? If we proceed with this argument as being both valuable and also possible, the next step is to consider the ways by which to teach business ethics to a group of students and this aim is the focus of the chapter.

History

Title of book

Handbook of research on teaching ethics in business and management education

Chapter number

33

Pagination

578 - 589

Publisher

IGI Global

Place of publication

Hershey, Pa.

ISBN-13

9781613505113

ISBN-10

1613505116

Language

eng

Publication classification

B1 Book chapter

Copyright notice

2012, IGI Global

Extent

36

Editor/Contributor(s)

C Wankel, A Stachowicz-Stanusch

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