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Sex identification of ancient DNA samples using a microfluidic device

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posted on 2015-01-01, 00:00 authored by K J Shaw, K A Brown, T A Brown, Stephen Haswell
© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015. Ancient DNA is the name given to the degraded, fragmented, and chemically damaged biomolecules that can be recovered from archaeological remains of plants, animals, and humans. Where ancient human DNA has survived at archaeological sites, it can give valuable information and is especially useful for its potential to identify kinship, population affinities, pathogens, and biological sex. Here, we describe the operation of a microfluidic device for the sex identification of ancient DNA samples using an efficient sample handling process. DNA is extracted from powdered bone samples and abasic sites labeled with biotin. Streptavidincoated superparamagnetic particles are used to isolate the labeled DNA prior to amplification of the Amelogenin sex marker.

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Title of book

Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis Protocols

Volume

1274

Pagination

93 - 98

Publisher

Humana Press

Place of publication

New York, N.Y.

ISSN

1064-3745

Publication classification

X Not reportable; BN.1 Other book chapter, or book chapter not attributed to Deakin

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