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Thresholds, incidence functions, and species-specific cues : responses of woodland birds to landscape structure in south-eastern Australia

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posted on 2009-01-01, 00:00 authored by Andrew Bennett, Jim Radford
Looking out from a vantage point across a large tract of forest gives a superficial impression of uniformity: the crowns of canopy trees follow the folds and contours of the landscape to provide a continuous cover of wooded vegetation. But this visual appearance belies the truth: forested landscapes are far from uniform. On closer examination, they comprise a complex mosaic of different vegetation types and and stands of different age-classes, differing structural features, and modified to a varying extent by human land-uses. Forests have a critical role in the conservation of biodiversity throughout the world (Peterken 1996; Laurance and Bierregard 1997; Lindenmayer and Franklin 2002) and a key feature contributing to their conservation value is the response of forest biota to the heterogeneity inherent in forested landscapes (Lindenmayer et al. 2006). Consequently, an understanding of the implications of landscape structure for the maintainance of species and ecological processes is an important foundation for forest management and biodiversity conservation.

History

Title of book

Setting conservation targets for managed forest landscapes

Series

Conservation Biology 16

Chapter number

8

Pagination

161 - 184

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

Place of publication

New York, N. Y.

ISBN-13

9780521877091

ISBN-10

0521877091

Language

eng

Publication classification

B1 Book chapter

Copyright notice

2009, Cambridge University Press

Extent

18

Editor/Contributor(s)

M Villard, B Jonsson