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Comparison of the traditional problem-based learning format and larger, directed, independent study groups

conference contribution
posted on 2009-01-01, 00:00 authored by Daryl Pedler, D Birks, H Phillips, E Wearne, C Haigh
Problem based learning has been implemented as a pedagogical tool world-wide across a range of health professions since its inception at McMaster University, Canada, in 1969 (Neville & Norman, 2007). In addition to enhancing knowledge and understanding it is also claimed that PBL develops communication skills, encourages teamwork, sharing of information and respect for others, furthers problem solving skills, and allows students to assume responsibility for their own learning (Wood, 2003). However, the cognitive outcomes of PBL and traditional pedagogy (based on didactic teaching) are similar and hence widespread adoption of PBL has been questioned (see Colliver, 2000). Criticisms of PBL include its resource hungry nature, requiring, as it does, experienced tutors to facilitate .learning across several clusters of students dealing with the same problem. Given the actual and anticipated increase in numbers of medical students in Australia other strategies that retain the advantages of PBL, while minimising the demands on faculty, should now be explored. This paper reports our experience with a modification of the traditional PBL approach, termed PBLplus. This innovation was trialled in a regional clinical school, attached to a hospital, with a group of 19 graduate entry students, who had completed an integrated Year 1 / 2 of the MBBS. PBLplus involved allocating students from the whole class to three task directed groups. Groups had specified assignments to complete to facilitate learning across the whole class. A tutor listened to student presentations and provided an interactive presentation. Hence use of tutors was made more efficient, and faculty input was more specialised.

History

Event

Australian and New Zealand Association of Medical Education. Conference (2009 : Launceston, Tas.)

Pagination

132 - 132

Publisher

Conference Design

Location

Launceston, Tas.

Place of publication

Hobart, Tas.

Start date

2009-06-30

End date

2009-07-03

ISBN-13

9780980578706

Language

eng

Publication classification

E3.1 Extract of paper

Copyright notice

2009, ANZAPH, ( formerly ANZAME)

Title of proceedings

ANZAME 09 : Bridging professional islands : Handbook : Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Medical Education

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