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Emergency responses for clinical deterioration within and beyond 24 hours of emergency admission: Patient outcomes and ICU implications

conference contribution
posted on 2015-02-01, 00:00 authored by Judy CurreyJudy Currey, D Charlesworth, Julie ConsidineJulie Considine
Introduction: The National Emergency Access Target was implemented to ensure 90% of patients leave emergency departments (EDs) within 4h. The impact of time driven performance on the number of physiologically unstable ward-based patients is unknown. An increase in clinical deterioration episodes potentially leading to adverse events will have resource implications for intensive care units (ICUs).
Objectives: To compare the characteristics and outcomes of patients who required an emergency response for clinical deterioration (cardiac arrest team or rapid response system activation) within and beyond 24 h of emergency admission to general medical and surgical units.
Methods: A retrospective exploratory design was used. The study site was a 365 bed urban hospital in Melbourne. Emergency responses for clinical deterioration during 2012 were examined.
Results: Of 819 emergency responses for clinical deterioration, 587 patients were admitted via ED. The median time to first responsewas59h, 28.4% of patients required this <24 h after admission. One in eight patients required ICU admission. Comparison of patients requiring a response within and beyond 24h of admission showed no significant differences in age, gender, waiting times, ED length of stay or in-hospital mortality rates. Patients in whom first emergency response occurred <24h after admission were less likely to be admitted to ICU immediately following the emergency response (7.6% vs 13.9%, p-0.039), less likely to have recurrent emergency responses during their hospitalisation (9.7% vs 34.0%, p<0.001), and had shorter median hospital length of stay (7 vs 11 days, p<0.001).
Conclusions: Considerable ICU resources were utilised given one in eight patients required ICU admission following emergency response, and patients admitted via the ED constituted 55% of all rapid response system activations. Exploring potential antecedents to clinical deterioration in this cohort may assist in establishing risk management strategies to reduce utilisation of ICU resources.

History

Volume

28

Issue

1

Pagination

40 - 40

Publisher

ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC

Location

a

Start date

2015-01-01

End date

2015-01-01

ISSN

1036-7314

Language

eng

Publication classification

E3 Extract of paper

Copyright notice

2015, Elsevier

Title of proceedings

Australian Critical Care

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