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Knowledge sharing by organisations in sustainable development projects

conference contribution
posted on 2009-01-01, 00:00 authored by Rosemary Van Der Meer, Lioubov Torlina, Jamie MustardJamie Mustard
There are an increasing number of organisations seeing the benefits of implementing sustainable development practices within their processes and product design. However, there are a number of barriers that are preventing organisations from taking up this challenge. Some of these barriers could be reduced through the application of better external knowledge sharing. This paper explores the potential for sharing knowledge about sustainable development practices in academic and industry journals. Using content analysis, the types of projects that are discussed and the level of detail provided in the reporting of sustainable development initiatives by organisations are examined to identify what is being communicated and more importantly to identify what is not being shared. The results show that there is a lack of detail in reporting with a focus on reporting only certain types of sustainable development projects that may prevent knowledge sharing from occurring.

History

Event

Australasian Conference on Information Systems (20th : 2009 : Melbourne, Vic.)

Pagination

785 - 795

Publisher

Monash University

Location

Melbourne, Vic.

Place of publication

Melbourne, Vic.

Start date

2009-12-02

End date

2009-12-04

Language

eng

Notes

Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.

Publication classification

E1 Full written paper - refereed

Copyright notice

2009, Monash University and The Authors

Title of proceedings

ACIS 2009 : Evolving boundaries and new frontiers: defining the IS discipline : Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Conference on Information Systems

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